Tag Archives: University of Florida

The true character of Urban Meyer

From Yahoo! News

Florida Gators coach Will Muschamp met with a few reporters in a hotel room here in the moments before the start of SEC Media Days, and he wasted no time in firing a salvo at the man who used to sit in his chair: Urban Meyer.

It’s been reported that Meyer, now at Ohio State, turned in his old school for two secondary recruiting violations. Meyer denied it; Muschamp confirmed it:

“In both situations we were turned in by Ohio,” he said. “We didn’t do anything wrong. The University of Florida didn’t do anything wrong. And so we appreciated our friends from Ohio making sure we’re compliant with NCAA rules. They certainly know a little bit about that subject.”

It’s not just on the field issues.

Meyer seemed to flee responsibility earlier this month when he was asked about Hernandez. “I’m not going to talk about that,” he said. Meyer later spoke more about Hernandez and his efforts to help him (which were not insignificant), but by then the list of scofflaws he coached in Gainesville had been pinged around social media for days. Nobody in Gator Country has rushed to Meyer’s defense.

“You can’t stick your head in the sand and pretend everything’s OK,” Muschamp said Tuesday. He didn’t say Meyer stuck his head in the sand, but the insinuation is clear: the spiral of misbehavior only got worse until Muschamp showed up and altered the culture.

Halapio said Tuesday that team rules are more or less the same under “Coach Boom.” He listed “no stealing,” “no hitting girls,” and “being respectful to everybody” as themes Muschamp has reinforced. He even said Muschamp tells players to look everyone in the eye when shaking their hand. It’s not fair or appropriate to say Meyer paid no attention to off-the-field behavior, yet more than one Gator commented to Yahoo! Sports last year about how things started to slide during the waning months of Meyer’s tenure at Florida.

“Toward the end of Coach Meyer’s time here, a lot of guys were out for themselves,” defensive lineman Omar Hunter said. “Not buying into the team concept. He was out for himself, so they thought the same thing.

“A lot of things were sliding. Guys were showing up late to practice and workouts. Guys were supposed to be back on Sunday and didn’t get back until Monday. There was no discipline.”

Why Tim Tebow won’t make it in the NFL

From Dave Fleming at ESPN

When the Broncos defense was on the field, offensive coaches would often tell Tebow the first series of plays they wanted to run when the team got the ball back. Tebow would nod, and they’d separate. And then, invariably, a short while later he’d ask for the information again. Sometimes this ritual would repeat right up until Tebow had to duck into the huddle and call the play. As a result, despite starting only 11 games in 2011, Tebow was flagged for delay of game an NFL-high seven times. Worse still was the fact that, according to scouts, Tebow almost never audibled because he struggled to quickly and properly read defenses. And of all the deadly sins Tebow committed against quarterbacking, this was the worst: lacking the self-awareness to recognize and fix these shortcomings. Maybe the most shocking part of Tebowmania isn’t that he has been cast out of the NFL after just three years but that he lasted as long as he did.

The weird part about reading this is that when Josh McDaniels drafted Tebow, all he talked about was Tebow’s football IQ.

In a meeting room at the NFL scouting combine in Indianapolis, Broncos coach Josh McDaniels and Tim Tebow sat several feet apart, engaged in animated, rapid-fire conversation about football. They clicked almost immediately.

McDaniels was convinced Tebow was genuine. He came away even more intrigued with Tebow as a player.

Tebow, an All-America quarterback at Florida and the 2007 Heisman Trophy winner, felt he had found a kindred football spirit.

“I was jacked leaving that room. I didn’t even want to visit another room. It was not enough time,” Tebow said. “We were excited, we were enthusiastic. There was passion. It was just intense, and it was ball, and it was juice. The juice level in that room was high, and it was awesome.”

The Dave Fleming has this.

But he scored a below-average (for QBs) 22 on his Wonderlic test. As a kinesthetic learner, Tebow absorbs information better through using flash cards and hands-on repetitive experience than the traditional method of memorizing diagrams, notes and Polaroids from a playbook. 

I have taken the Wonderlic (and done quite well on it).  it’s not that hard and if someone does poor on it, I would have some serious questions about their comprehension abilities.  That may not be that important if you are cornerback or a defensive tackle but if you are a QB and you have comprehension problems, it is big deal.

The disturbing question in all of this is why then did Josh McDaniels draft him?  It seems like they bonded personally and that made all of the other issues (like completing passes and reading offences) go away.  

Tim Tebow Drafted by the Denver Broncos

Tim Tebow of the Denver Broncos

So the Denver Broncos drafted the heir apparent to John Elway by drafting former Heisman winner Tim Tebow from the University of Florida Gators.  Tebow has been called the greatest college quarterback ever and is probably the most popular college player in recent years which means that he has his fair share of Tebow haters out there.

Here are my thoughts on the pick.

Tim Tebow Denver Broncos Jersey I can’t figure out how a guy that supposed to be drafted in the third round two weeks ago leaps to the first round.  Now I know Denver brought him in for a workout and I know that he probably could make “all of the throws” but Tebow comes from a college offense that isn’t well suited for the pros.  While he was a great college runner, his 4.74 speed won’t cause incredible fear in the pro game as he can be run down by most linebackers and some defensive ends.

In Florida he had very poor mechanics with a very elongated release that would cause serious problems in the NFL.  Of course in a couple of weeks he managed to make his release a lot more compact which won him a lot of praise for changing it so soon (and created some questions about Urban Meyers ability to coach a quarterback).  In Florida he tended to lock onto a receiver and rarely wet through multiple reads before tucking it and running.

His fans will say that he is a really hard worker on and off the field and let’s be honest, few NFL games he will be in will be more pressure packed than two BCS Championship games or his games versus Florida State (than again, those probably were more like practicing against Florida’s scout defense considering the state of FSU football right now).

I keep hearing that Josh McDaniels will essentially redshirt Tim Tebow in 2010, coach him, and let him compete for a backup role in 2011 with the idea that he can compete for the starting job in 2013.  This makes a lot of sense as it what Green Bay did with Aaron Rodgers and look how that turned out.  Unless of course you have and 8-8 team and just traded away your franchise quarterback last season, your franchise receiver and a really good pass catching tight end this season.  In other words, this makes a lot of sense if Andy Reid had done it, if Mike Shanahan had done it (even in Washington), if Bill Bilichick had done it but not so much when Josh McDaniels does it.  The Denver Broncos have a lot of immediate needs on both offense and defense than quarterback in the first round.  First round draft picks are supposed to start now, not in a couple of years.  You don’t reach in the first round unless your name is Al Davis.

The Denver Broncos better get off to a fast start and sustain it this year; otherwise the fans and media will start calling for Tebow to play before he is ready. That could be a disaster for everyone involved.

A good choice

Urban Meyer

It was good to see Urban Meyer leave Florida yesterday.   I like Meyer and while it is sad that he has to leave Florida under these circumstances, I am glad for him and his family that he made this decision before the stress of the job caused him to die of a heart attack.  As Yahoo!’s Dr. Saturday says.

There’s something to be said for his luck, too: At 45, he walks away with no permanent heart damage and no immediate threats to his long-term health if he manages his stress. He doesn’t get the fairy tale ending in Gaineville, the third national championship that would have encased his legacy there in solid gold for at least the rest of his children’s and grandchildren’s lives. At least now he gets to see his grandchildren.

The end of the Charlie Weis era

Notre Dame Fighting Irish Well Charlie Weis is out at Notre Dame.  Notre Dame had an incredible aerial attack but couldn’t run the ball out on close games and had a horrific defense for most of Weis’ tenure.  In the end Weis didn’t beat better teams than Notre Dame and often were beat by inferior teams.

Despite that, I felt really down when they announced his firing.  From all accounts, Charlie Weis is a really good man who recruited athletes that the University of Notre Dame should be proud of.  He was also a great offensive coach but couldn’t hire effective defensive coaches or could not recruit good enough athletes on the defensive side of the ball.  Notre Dame’s front seven constantly lost the war in the trenches and you aren’t going to win too many games if you can’t stop the run.  You also won’t hold many leads if you can’t run out a game and Notre Dame could not.

Former Notre Dame coach Charlie Weis So what do you do now?  Michael Ventre of MSNBC asks the question, “Would even half of the Florida Gators be able to qualify to enroll at Notre Dame?”  He suggests that Notre Dame needs to lower academic standards to allow better players to qualify.  Dan Wetzel sees it differently, “When Notre Dame gets a good coach again, it will be good again. This isn’t rocket science. Had the Irish snapped up current Florida coach Urban Meyer, a former star assistant, when they could have, there would be no debate, Notre Dame would be Notre Dame.”   Weis signed plenty of players that USC and Florida and others wanted. He had a team that was good enough for nine or 10 wins. He just couldn’t coach them into a viable unit.

Now if I was Cleveland Browns owner Randy Lerner and for some reason, I was still committed to Eric Mangini as my coach, I would hire Charlie Weiss as my team’s offensive coordinator and see what he can get out of Brady Quinn.  Remember, Brady Quinn is from Cleveland if he can make him into a franchise quarterback or even a QB that can get the Browns into the playoffs on a regular basis, it would energize the Cleveland fan base.  While it isn’t as common now as it was in the 90s, there can still be a role for the superstar offensive coordinator.