Tag Archives: Roman Catholic Church

Our Lady of Lourdes Parish

Our Lady of Lourdes Parish is a daughter of St. Joseph’s Church. On September 16, 1963, Our Lady of Lourdes Chapel and Auditorium officially opened and was blessed by Bishop Francis J. Klein. The architects were Webster, Forrester, & Scott and the contractor was Boychuk Construction Company.  Originally, Our Lady of Lourdes was under the direction of St. Joseph’s Parish and served by priests from St. Joseph’s Church. However, with the fast growing community, it became apparent that the Our Lady of Lourdes chapel population was big enough to become a parish.

Our Lady of Lourdes ParishOur Lady of Lourdes ParishOur Lady of Lourdes ParishOur Lady of Lourdes Parish

Our Lady of Lourdes received official parish designation on August 15, 1965. In September 1965, the Parish of Our Lady of Lourdes was officially formed. With this designation, Our Lady of Lourdes became a full parish under the Episcopal Corporation of Saskatoon and gained rights to perform marriages, christenings, and burials.

The Abandoned Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church)

The Abandoned Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church) in Fish Creek, SaskatchewanThe Abandoned Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church) in Fish Creek, SaskatchewanThe Abandoned Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church) in Fish Creek, SaskatchewanThe Abandoned Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church) in Fish Creek, SaskatchewanFish Creek, Saskatchewan

The first church services in the surrounding area apparently occurred in Fort Carlton in 1838. Roman Catholic missionaries served the people of the area beginning in 1870.

The first church in the RM of Fish Creek was part of the Métis settlement along the South Saskatchewan river. It is often reffered to as the Fish Creek Church but it’s religious name was the Immaculate Conception Church. It was a Roman Catholic church, built in 1901. Prior to that, settlers went to the Catholic Church in Batoche, St. Antoine de Padoue, which had been built in 1883, for marriages and christenings and funerals. Father Brueck who was responsible for St. Patrick Orphanage in Prince Albert was sent to Fish Creek to set up the mission in 1900. A portion of a letter sent to his bishop is included in "Kaleidescope. Many Cultures, One Faith." Father Theodore Krist became the first resident priest. He had River Lot 12 in Township 42A. This first church was dedicated to the Immaculate Conception on December 8, 1901. Little is recorded about the original members of this church, but they were presumably all Metis. It is interesting that the first priests were German but they likely also spoke French.

The original church was burnt in 1920 and a new church was built on the same site following a plan similar to the original church. The three altars of this church were built by Peter Bukowsky and his sister Wilhemina made the altar linens.

In 1954, the parish became a mission of Alvena and the church was closed in 1957. In 1973 the land and church was sold to Joe & Olga Bazowski. He planted wheat right up to the church in the hopes of preventing vandalism. Although abandoned, it still stands on private land owned by Olga Bazowski.

Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church)

The first church services in the surrounding area apparently occurred in Fort Carlton in 1838. Roman Catholic missionaries served the people of the area beginning in 1870 (Lavigne 1990).

The first church in the RM of Fish Creek was part of the Métis settlement along the South Saskatchewan river. It is often referred to as the Fish Creek Church but it’s religious name was the Immaculate Conception Church. It was a Roman Catholic church, built in 1901. Prior to that, settlers went to the Catholic Church in Batoche, St. Antoine de Padoue, which had been built in 1883, for marriages and christenings and funerals. Father Brueck who was responsible for St. Patrick Orphanage in Prince Albert was sent to Fish Creek to set up the mission in 1900. A portion of a letter sent to his bishop is included in "Kaleidescope. Many Cultures, One Faith." Father Theodore Krist became the first resident priest. He had River Lot 12 in Township 42A. This first church was dedicated to the Immaculate Conception on December 8, 1901. Little is recorded about the original members of this church, but they were presumably all Metis. It is interesting that the first priests were German but they likely also spoke French.

The original church was burnt in 1920 and a new church was built on the same site following a plan similar to the original church. The three altars of this church were built by Peter Bukowsky and his sister Wilhemina made the altar linens.

In 1954, the parish became a mission of Alvena and the church was closed in 1957 (Lavigne 1990). In 1973 the land and church was sold to Joe & Olga Bazowski. He planted wheat right up to the church in the hopes of preventing vandalism. Although abandoned, it still stands on private land owned by Olga Bazowski.

Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church)Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church)Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church)Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church)Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church)Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church)

What does the name Francis mean for the modern church

It appears to be a good first step

So why Bergoglio? He is a first-generation Argentinian, of Italian descent, who has been in Italy and involved in the governance of the Church for many years. He must have excellent relations with his fellow cardinals. He can simultaneously serve as a symbol for Catholicism in the global south and assuage any concerns of the Italian cardinals that they are losing control over the papacy with a third consecutive non-Italian pope. He is relatively old, but now that Benedict has set an example of voluntary retirement, Pope Francis can choose to follow his predecessor’s path as needed. Whatever one thinks of Benedict’s reign as Pope, part of his legacy will be that he enabled his successors to resign without drama.

Second, the choice of name reveals much about a new pope’s state of mind as he steps out onto the balcony to address the world as pontifex. He chose his name, his spokesman revealed, in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the great saints in Catholic history. Francis was the son of a cloth merchant who became a kind of living saint during his lifetime. He preached and practiced radical poverty, founded a new way of living a life in the church, embraced the presence of God in all living things, and left behind a vibrant (if sometimes divided) order named after him. These friars of St. Francis took vows and lived by a set of rules that Francis drew up, but were supposed to travel and preach to all. Cardinal Bergoglio embodied a kind of exemplary simplicity in his own life, riding the bus instead of in a limousine, living in a simple apartment instead of a palace, and cooking for himself. While this is a far cry from Francis’ poverty, Bergoglio never lived as a grand prince of the Church. A pope named after St. Francis of Assisi might well focus on questions of social justice, poverty, and personal piety, as well as environmental justice.

But Bergoglio is a Jesuit, and one of the two most important saints in Jesuit history was also named Francis. St. Francis Xavier was a missionary and evangelist. He personally travelled to South and East Asia and died in 1552 just off the coast of China. By taking the same name as Francis Xavier, the epitome of the Catholic global evangelist, the new pope suggests he is ready to push the Vatican from a Eurocentric to a global position.

It is impossible to think that a Jesuit, now Pope Francis, wasn’t thinking of his famous predecessor in the Jesuit Order when he chose his name. Catholic theology embraces the idea that multiple, even contradictory, principles can co-exist within the same object. Jesus can be both God and Man. The Host can be both body and bread. Pope Francis can draw inspiration from both Saints Francis as he enters this new phase of his life. Perhaps even more importantly, he can nod to his Jesuit tradition, while taking as his inspiration both the universality and the message of reform from St. Francis of Assisi. It’s a savvy and meaningful decision.

300,000 babies have been kidnapped in Spain

It was a form of “political cleansing”

From the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, in 1936, until well into the 1990s, more than 300,000 children were reportedly taken from their biological parents and passed on to adoptive parents.

In regions captured by the anti-communist Nationalists during the war, doctors and nuns felt it was their patriotic duty to take newborns from "red parents" and give them to other families. There, they were to be raised in accordance with Nationalist and Catholic beliefs.

After the victory of the rebels under General Francisco Franco over the Republicans, the organized theft of babies became a political tool, a way of depriving leftists of their offspring. In 1941, Franco enacted a law that made it permissible to erase evidence of the ancestry of such children by changing their last names.

Most of these stolen children were entrusted to the care of Catholics loyal to the regime. The aim behind this was to rid an entire people of the "Marxist gene," at least according to the theories of Antonio Vallejo-Nájera, the national psychiatrist of Francoist Spain, that were widespread at the time.

St. Boniface Cathedral in Winnipeg

St. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in Winnipeg

The shell of the old St. Boniface Cathedral in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

In November 1, 1818, Father Joseph-Norbert Provencher built on this site a small log chapel which he dedicated to Saint Boniface, the English missionary monk and apostle, who spread the Catholic faith among the Germanic tribes in the 8th century. Saint Boniface, the first permanent mission west of the Great Lakes, became the heart of Roman Catholic missionary activity extending to the Pacific and Arctic coasts, as well as serving the growing population of the Red River Settlement.

Five cathedrals have stood on this beautiful location. In 1832, Bishop Provencher erected a cathedral surmounted by twin spires, and in 1862 a stone cathedral was built under the direction of Bishop Taché. On August 15, 1906, Archbishop Langevin blessed the cornerstone of what became one of the most imposing churches in Western Canada. It was designed by the Montreal architectural firm of Marchand and Haskell. This structure, the best example of French Romanesque architecture in Manitoba, was ravaged by fire on July 22, 1968.

Louis Riel, together with many of the West’s first Catholic settlers, key figures and missionaries, is buried here in Western Canada’s oldest Catholic cemetery.

iPhone app allows users to go to confession

iPhone app allows users to go to confession The best part is that it costs $1.99 at the app store.

Described as "the perfect aid for every penitent", it offers users tips and guidelines to help them with the sacrament.

Now senior church officials in both the UK and US have given it their seal of approval, in what is thought to be a first.

The app takes users through the sacrament – in which Catholics admit their wrongdoings – and allows them to keep track of their sins.

It also allows them to examine their conscience based on personalised factors such as age, sex and marital status – but it is not intended to replace traditional confession entirely.

This isn’t their first digital effort

Two years later created a Facebook application that lets users send virtual postcards featuring the pontiff.

Before you mock it, when I went to Bishop James Mahoney High School in Saskatoon, we had a similar checklist to speed up the confession process (as a Methodist, I just judged others silently) so it’s not like this is a new idea.  Of course we still had a priest to administer the sacrament.

America’s History of Fear

Good column today by Nicholas Kristof

Screeds against Catholics from the 19th century sounded just like the invective today against the Not-at-Ground-Zero Mosque. The starting point isn’t hatred but fear: an alarm among patriots that newcomers don’t share their values, don’t believe in democracy, and may harm innocent Americans.

Followers of these movements against Irish, Germans, Italians, Chinese and other immigrants were mostly decent, well-meaning people trying to protect their country. But they were manipulated by demagogues playing upon their fears — the 19th- and 20th-century equivalents of Glenn Beck.

Most Americans stayed on the sidelines during these spasms of bigotry, and only a small number of hoodlums killed or tormented Catholics, Mormons or others. But the assaults were possible because so many middle-of-the-road Americans were ambivalent.

Suspicion of outsiders, of people who behave or worship differently, may be an ingrained element of the human condition, a survival instinct from our cave-man days. But we should also recognize that historically this distrust has led us to burn witches, intern Japanese-Americans, and turn away Jewish refugees from the Holocaust.

Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles

The ATM at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the AngelsCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaCathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, California

The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, informally known as COLA or the Los Angeles Cathedral, is a Latin Church cathedral of the Roman Catholic Church in Los Angeles, California, United States of America. Opened in 2002, the cathedral serves as the mother church for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

The structure replaced the Cathedral of Saint Vibiana, which was severely damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Under Cardinal Roger Mahony, the cathedral was constructed in post-modern architecture and formally opened in September 2002. There was considerable controversy over its deconstructivist and modernist design, as well as the high costs to complete the building.

The cathedral is named in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary under the patronal title of Our Lady of the Angels, echoing the full name of the original settlement of Los Angeles (Spanish: El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles, or "The Town of Our Lady the Queen of the Angels"). The cathedral is widely known for enshrining the relics of Saint Vibiana and tilma piece of Our Lady of Guadalupe. It is the mother church to approximately five million professed Catholics in the archdiocese.

Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels

The Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, California

The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, informally known as COLA or the Los Angeles Cathedral, is a Latin-ritecathedral of the Roman Catholic Church in Los Angeles, California, United States of America. Opened in 2002, the cathedral serves as the mother church for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

The structure replaced the Cathedral of Saint Vibiana, which was severely damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Under Cardinal Roger Mahony, the cathedral was constructed in post-modern architecture and formally opened in September 2002.

The cathedral was designed by the Pritzker Prize-winning Spanish architect Rafael Moneo. Using elements ofpostmodern architecture, the church and the Cathedral Center feature a series of acute and obtuse angles while avoiding right angles. Contemporary statuary and appointments decorate the complex. Prominent of these appointments are the bronze doors and the statue called The Virgin Mary, all adorning the entrance and designed by Robert Graham.

The prices for some cathedral furnishings have also caused consternation. $5 million was budgeted for the altar, the main bronze doors cost $3 million, $2 million was budgeted for the wooden ambo (lectern) and $1 million for the tabernacle. $1 million was budgeted for the cathedra (bishop’s chair), $250,000 for the presider’s chair, $250,000 for each deacon’s chair, and $150,000 for each visiting bishops’ chair, while pews cost an average of $50,000 each. The cantor’s stand cost $100,000 while each bronze chandelier/speaker cost $150,000. The great costs incurred in its construction and Mahony’s long efforts to get it built led critics to dub it the "Taj Mahony” and the "Rog Mahal".