Tag Archives: Metis

The Abandoned Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church)

The Abandoned Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church) in Fish Creek, SaskatchewanThe Abandoned Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church) in Fish Creek, SaskatchewanThe Abandoned Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church) in Fish Creek, SaskatchewanThe Abandoned Fish Creek Church (Immaculate Conception Church) in Fish Creek, SaskatchewanFish Creek, Saskatchewan

The first church services in the surrounding area apparently occurred in Fort Carlton in 1838. Roman Catholic missionaries served the people of the area beginning in 1870.

The first church in the RM of Fish Creek was part of the M├ętis settlement along the South Saskatchewan river. It is often reffered to as the Fish Creek Church but it’s religious name was the Immaculate Conception Church. It was a Roman Catholic church, built in 1901. Prior to that, settlers went to the Catholic Church in Batoche, St. Antoine de Padoue, which had been built in 1883, for marriages and christenings and funerals. Father Brueck who was responsible for St. Patrick Orphanage in Prince Albert was sent to Fish Creek to set up the mission in 1900. A portion of a letter sent to his bishop is included in "Kaleidescope. Many Cultures, One Faith." Father Theodore Krist became the first resident priest. He had River Lot 12 in Township 42A. This first church was dedicated to the Immaculate Conception on December 8, 1901. Little is recorded about the original members of this church, but they were presumably all Metis. It is interesting that the first priests were German but they likely also spoke French.

The original church was burnt in 1920 and a new church was built on the same site following a plan similar to the original church. The three altars of this church were built by Peter Bukowsky and his sister Wilhemina made the altar linens.

In 1954, the parish became a mission of Alvena and the church was closed in 1957. In 1973 the land and church was sold to Joe & Olga Bazowski. He planted wheat right up to the church in the hopes of preventing vandalism. Although abandoned, it still stands on private land owned by Olga Bazowski.