Tag Archives: Joi Ito

How to Raise Funds for Non-Profits

Joi Ito has a great post on fundraising here

Good executive directors (ED) were also the main fund raisers and they generally loved fund raising. In fact, there was a strong opinion of many that any ED who wasn’t excited about fund raising, shouldn’t be the ED.

Fund raising is about relationships and building relationships and is very different from sales and marketing in normal for-profits.

In a non-profit, you’re not selling some good or service to a customer. What you’re doing is helping the donor fulfill or pursue a dream or a cause. In order to be successful you have to understand the donor and become part of their world view.

Many non-profits think of donors as a funding source to pay for programs that execute on their mission. In fact, donors should be part of the mission. Good non-profits integrate the funding model directly into the mission. Churches are usually MUCH better at raising money than the natural history museum because "giving" is an integral part of the church-going experience whereas the natural history museum usually tries to collect money from the outside to allow them to run their mission internally.

Neoteny

I read this by Joi Ito this morning and I thought it fit in well with our discussion here.

Neoteny is the retention of childlike attributes in adulthood. Human beings are younger longer than any other creature on earth, taking almost twenty years until we become adults. While we retain many our childlike attributes into adulthood most of us stop playing when we become adults and focus on work.

When we are young, we learn, we socialize, we play, we experiment, we are curious, we feel wonder, we feel joy, we change, we grow, we imagine, we hope.

In adulthood, we are serious, we produce, we focus, we fight, we protect and we believe in things strongly.

The future of the planet is becoming less about being efficient, producing more stuff and protecting our turf and more about working together, embracing change and being creative.

We live in an age where people are starving in the midst of abundance and our greatest enemy is our own testosterone driven urge to control our territory and our environments.

It’s time we listen to children and allow neoteny to guide us beyond the rigid frameworks and dogma created by adults.

Why I Love Dopplr

My personal velocity

Dopplr I have become a big fan of Dopplr over the last years.  It’s a service that allows you to plan and share your trips online.  It also does some fun things like track your personal velocity which as you can see, isn’t that impressive (Joi Ito’s personal velocity is that of a Whippet while Larry Lessig’s is the same as an elephant while Wendy’s is the same as a glacier) and also shows how much carbon you are emitting.image

It also ties into Flickr and shows your photos for each of your previous trips.

Like all Web 2.0 sites, it allows you to share data with your friends and also contribute reviews of restaurants, places to explore, and places to stay when you travel.  It uses Flickr’s machine tags to link your own photos of places to places where you have been.  I have contributed to places all over the world but if you look at Arlington Beach on Dopplr, you can see how it works in a local community.

Dopplr app for iPhone and iPod Touch For those of you with an iPod Touch or a iPhone, there is also a great Dopplr app that allows you to find attractions and reviews of sites in your area.  I would have loved to have it when I was Chicago earlier this year.

One of the reason however that I have become a big fan of Dopplr is that as a family, it gives us a chance to visualize what the next couple of months have in store for us.  It let’s us look at our schedule, budget, plans, and goals and helps us find when we can go to the lake, do some travelling, and figure out when work is going to put demands on us.  Wendy is using Dopplr now as well and even Mark is going online to check out hers or my profiles to figure out when he needs to be packed.

The other cool way Dopplr is helpful is their annual report that is generated for all users.  Below is one for Barack Obama which gives you an idea of how much travelling he had to do in his run for President of the United States.

2008 Personal annual report for Barack Obama on Dopplr

My friend Dan Sheffield who works for the Free Methodist Church in Canada uses Dopplr.  Dan’s world travels would make his annual report fascinating (to me anyways).  It reminded me that it would be an effective for any denominational executive or someone who both had to travel a lot and be responsible to a constituency. 

I would love to see my city councilor, MLA, MP, and other elected officials use Dopplr (I would give bonus points to anyone who actually gave honest reviews that made my travelling easier).  If you are using Dopplr and want to connect with me, you can find me at dopplr.com/traveller/jordon.