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Jeff Browaty

Some Winnipeg politicians defend the status quo

Some Winnipeg city councillors don’t want to lead and want city Bus Rapid Transit line to go to city wide referendum

“I honestly don’t think it’s our best value for almost $600 million,” Browaty (North Kildonan) said, adding several of the city’s other transportation needs should warrant a higher priority and can be funded with all the funds allocated for the bus corridor, citing the westward extension of the Chief Peguis trail, widening of Kenaston Boulevard and the Waverley underpass.

“Everyone of them provides a better value for money than rapid transit phase two.”

Browaty joins St. James-Brooksland councillor Scott Fielding in opposition to the project.

The city is preparing a formal request for $140 million in federal funding for the project but Browaty said that request should be put on hold.

Browaty said he favours a non-binding plebiscite or referendum be included in the Oct. 22 civic election ballot, asking Winnipeggers if they support the completion of the rapid transit project, adding he’s prepared to move a motion at next week’s council meeting to put that into place.

Browaty’s concerns come a day after the civic administration released a detailed report on the $590-million bus rapid transit corridor, which needs to be endorsed by council at its June meeting before Ottawa will consider the application for financial assistance.

The latest report says the city will have to pay $20 million a year for 30 years beginning in 2020, for its share of the project.

Again, cars = value while public transit equals burden in many politicians minds.  Some one needs to tell him that bus rapid transit projects provide tremendous economic payoff, often generating $10 for every dollar spent.