Tag Archives: Hilary Nelson

Ward 2 Roundtable

The Ward 2 Saskatoon City Council Roundtable

Lenore Swystun, Hilary Nelson, and myself hosted three charming candidates on running to be your Ward 2 councilor Saskatoon City Councilor on CFCR’s Civicly Speaking.

In the studio was incumbent Pat Lorje, Mark Zielke, and Hilary Gough who gave overviews of why they are running, what they are running on and how they would meet the challenges of the city in the next term.

You can listen to the MP3 of the show below.

Tonight at 6:30 Lenore and I host Ward 3 Councilor Ann Iwanchuk.  Challenger Mark Mills can’t make it.

Monday

The weekend that was: It was a quiet weekend.  I worked Saturday and then on Sunday, Wendy, Oliver and I drove to Moose Jaw to say goodbye to the last weekend of the summer at Deja Vu Cafe, one of our favorite diners.  Mark had to work and we ordered way too many delicious wings, especially after Oliver got full on his milkshake and ate a total of two wings.  This morning Mark and I were up early because he had a photo project to shoot the entire alphabet.  We went downtown early and photographed much of the downtown.

On my to-do list this week: On Tuesday I start the morning talking municipal politics with Phil Tank on CBC and end the day talking politics with Hilary Nelson and Lenore Swystun on CFCR.  In  between there I get to spend some quality time at RUH where I get to find out why my ankle hurts so much (it’s the infection) and I can’t walk in a straight line (that in concerning).

Procrastinating about: I am writing 15 gift guides for work this Christmas.  They start going live every three days in October.  I am done one of them.  It’s going to be about 30,000 words when it is all said and done.

Book I’m in the midst of: I saw a great tweet by Rosie Barton saying, “Elections are my Olympics” which made me laugh but I am not a big fan of the process.  With some friends that are working on opposite campaigns, I kind of find discomfort in the entire process and can’t wait until it is done.  To get my mind off this, I am reading Jared Diamond’s Collapse again.  It sounds bleak but I love the sections on society that avoided collapse by working together for solutions.

Music that seemed to catch my attention this past week:  A shocking amount of Bjork on Spotify.

How I’m feeling about this week: I’ve got some cool projects coming up that I can’t share yet so I am counting down the days until they happen.

New headphones (and The Wirecutter)

When Mark lost his beloved Skullcandy headphones a few years ago, I asked for some opinions on what to get him on Twitter.  Hilary (she’s the bot behind the @theotherhilary) tweeted that I should check out the reviews on The Wire Cutter.  They tested hundreds of pairs of in-ear headphones and recommended a pair of Panasonic RP-HJE123 in ear headphones for having the second best sound under $50.  They cost $15 since he doesn’t need the ones with a hands free mic on them.  I was happy, he was less than happy since I think he wanted some Dre Beats but you can’t win them all.

This week, Marley chewed up my mediocre Monster headphones and then ate some other ones that I liked so it was back to the Wire Cutter.  They again recommended the Panasonic RP-HJE123 In-Ear Headphones.  I found the cheaper microphoneless version of the headphones at Winners for $10 and got a white pair.

The best headphones under $100 gave the House of Marley Smile headphones a good review and I saw those at Best Buy for only $25.  I like the looks of them and I am quite happy with my House of Marley Chant.  Plus if my dog Marley chews them up, the wood will be good for her.

I’ll let them burn in and then decide on a favorite but it is really hard to dislike either one of these choices.

One of the best pieces of advice I have gotten has been to check out The Wirecutter for audio reviews.  I have saved a lot of money by not making bad purchases and have learned a lot on what to look for in audio.    Oh yeah, those Dre Beats you want, they cost $14 to make and sound like crap.

Saskatoon Transit: Why Saskatoon Needs a Better Transit System

Hilary has a great post at OurYXE about why Saskatoon needs an improved transit system

  • Transit levels the playing field for low-income people – people on a fixed income or minimum wage, where the annual cost of operating a car takes a huge bite out of their bottom line. Giving households who spend most or all of their money on essentials a chance to increase their take-home pay increases spending, boosting the economy, and the chance to move upwards in society. Timely access to employment, services, and family increases quality of life; for people who are unable to drive, a good transit system is worth it for the sense of autonomy over mobility it provides as one is not ‘trapped’.
  • Transit reduces demand on roadways, for parking, and is a key part of helping cities achieve higher densities. Roads cost money to maintain; expansion of roads takes property off tax rolls. Large intersections restrict access to properties on the corners, lowering attractiveness and therefore property values, increasing demand for police services as they become blighted. Bridges, as we know very well, are not cheap; it makes economic sense to maximise the ones we currently have. Underground parking is very expensive, driving up the cost of construction and thus the cost per unit of residential units situated above it. Single-car occupancy will not support the densities Saskatoon seeks to achieve in the downtown core. Reduced demand on the roadways reduces response times for emergency vehicles and people who for various reasons are unable to use transit.
  • Transit is not a viable option for all citizens; however non-users still benefit from lessened demand for parking and reduced congestion. Families with kids who are old enough to take the bus or senior members who are unable to drive anymore, Drivers in households with seniors who do not drive and children who are old enough to take the bus are freed from onerous chauffeur duties; kids gain a sense of independence and autonomy, while older adults can age in place.

The entire post is worth a read.