Tag Archives: cathedral

St. Boniface Cathedral in Winnipeg

St. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in WinnipegSt. Boniface Cathedral in Winnipeg

The shell of the old St. Boniface Cathedral in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

In November 1, 1818, Father Joseph-Norbert Provencher built on this site a small log chapel which he dedicated to Saint Boniface, the English missionary monk and apostle, who spread the Catholic faith among the Germanic tribes in the 8th century. Saint Boniface, the first permanent mission west of the Great Lakes, became the heart of Roman Catholic missionary activity extending to the Pacific and Arctic coasts, as well as serving the growing population of the Red River Settlement.

Five cathedrals have stood on this beautiful location. In 1832, Bishop Provencher erected a cathedral surmounted by twin spires, and in 1862 a stone cathedral was built under the direction of Bishop Taché. On August 15, 1906, Archbishop Langevin blessed the cornerstone of what became one of the most imposing churches in Western Canada. It was designed by the Montreal architectural firm of Marchand and Haskell. This structure, the best example of French Romanesque architecture in Manitoba, was ravaged by fire on July 22, 1968.

Louis Riel, together with many of the West’s first Catholic settlers, key figures and missionaries, is buried here in Western Canada’s oldest Catholic cemetery.

Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles

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The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, informally known as COLA or the Los Angeles Cathedral, is a Latin Church cathedral of the Roman Catholic Church in Los Angeles, California, United States of America. Opened in 2002, the cathedral serves as the mother church for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

The structure replaced the Cathedral of Saint Vibiana, which was severely damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Under Cardinal Roger Mahony, the cathedral was constructed in post-modern architecture and formally opened in September 2002. There was considerable controversy over its deconstructivist and modernist design, as well as the high costs to complete the building.

The cathedral is named in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary under the patronal title of Our Lady of the Angels, echoing the full name of the original settlement of Los Angeles (Spanish: El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles, or "The Town of Our Lady the Queen of the Angels"). The cathedral is widely known for enshrining the relics of Saint Vibiana and tilma piece of Our Lady of Guadalupe. It is the mother church to approximately five million professed Catholics in the archdiocese.

Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels

The Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, CaliforniaThe Cathedral of Our Lady of Angels in Los Angeles, California

The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, informally known as COLA or the Los Angeles Cathedral, is a Latin-ritecathedral of the Roman Catholic Church in Los Angeles, California, United States of America. Opened in 2002, the cathedral serves as the mother church for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

The structure replaced the Cathedral of Saint Vibiana, which was severely damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Under Cardinal Roger Mahony, the cathedral was constructed in post-modern architecture and formally opened in September 2002.

The cathedral was designed by the Pritzker Prize-winning Spanish architect Rafael Moneo. Using elements ofpostmodern architecture, the church and the Cathedral Center feature a series of acute and obtuse angles while avoiding right angles. Contemporary statuary and appointments decorate the complex. Prominent of these appointments are the bronze doors and the statue called The Virgin Mary, all adorning the entrance and designed by Robert Graham.

The prices for some cathedral furnishings have also caused consternation. $5 million was budgeted for the altar, the main bronze doors cost $3 million, $2 million was budgeted for the wooden ambo (lectern) and $1 million for the tabernacle. $1 million was budgeted for the cathedra (bishop’s chair), $250,000 for the presider’s chair, $250,000 for each deacon’s chair, and $150,000 for each visiting bishops’ chair, while pews cost an average of $50,000 each. The cantor’s stand cost $100,000 while each bronze chandelier/speaker cost $150,000. The great costs incurred in its construction and Mahony’s long efforts to get it built led critics to dub it the "Taj Mahony” and the "Rog Mahal".