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Buffalo

Buffalo’s Grain Elevators to Be Used in Large-Scale Narrative Lighting Display

Why can’t we do this in Saskatoon with our three mills?

The Erie Canal Harbor Development Corp., which oversees the development of the Buffalo waterfront, has come up with the plan, and they’ve enlisted Ambiances Design Production to do the lighting work. As the Buffalo News notes, Ambiances has received praise for a similar project in Quebec City, which was originally planned as a one-time show, but was adopted as an annual light show because of its success. Part of what makes Ambiences’ work unique is that it involves narrative storytelling, and it could be used to tell Buffalo’s stories.

Buffalo’s civic leaders think that could be key to drawing tourists to the reenergized Outer Harbor and Silo City areas. “People have talked for years about getting some of the people who go to Niagara Falls. Well, this is the type of thing, because of the spectacle of it, and because the Buffalo grain elevators are so otherworldly, that will get people down here,” preservationist Tim Tielman told the Buffalo News.

The first phase of the project will involve lighting a couple of large grain elevators near the waterfront, along with the underside of the Skyway and the Michigan and Ohio street bridges. The second phase would involve illuminating a total of 14 grain elevators, and incorporating fire, pyrotechnics and 3D video projection on the side of the Connecting Terminal grain elevator, which is located just at the edge of the recently-revitalized Buffalo Harbor.

The Cost of Professional Sports

If you live in New York, this should infuriate you

You might have missed this in the pre-holiday news dump, which it was specifically timed for—it’s a good idea to downplay the implications of a story like this. An agreement was announced in a “hastily called news conference” to keep the Bills in Buffalo (actually Orchard Park) through at least 2020. But the real story is in the details: the Bills have been allowed to pick up just 16 percent of the costs to keep them in town. If you’ve ever had the slightest curiosity as to how sweetheart a deal an NFL team can possibly get, the full agreement can be read below.

It’s going to cost $271 million for upgrades to Ralph Wilson Stadium and 10 years of running the place on gameday. The Bills will pay just $44 million of that. Erie County will cover $103 million, while the state of New York is on the hook for $123 million. If that turns out to be not cushy enough, the Bills can buy their way out of the lease after year seven. We and others have railed against the outrage of public financing for stadiums for years, but it’s still shocking to see in 2012 a textbook case of a community held for ransom, forced to give in to every last demand of a franchise threatening to move.