Tag Archives: blogging

Turning 10

JordonCooper.com is a decade old todayTen years ago today I published my first post on this site.  I wasn’t sure if this blogging thing was going to last but since then I have posted more then 11,000 times to the site and the traffic has grown quite a bit.  There hasn’t been many changes to the site.  It was first powered by Blogger, then Blogger Pro, and then back to plain Blogger again after Google purchased it.  After 8000 posts, I moved the site to WordPress.

I started to post here because Andrew Careaga wrote a book called e-vangelism back in the early days of the interweb and he published a newsletter that talked about technology and faith.  I never read the book (sorry Andrew) but I did read the newsletter.  In it he talked about Blogger and how you could use it to keep a church website updated.  That is how I discovered Blogger and the rest has been history.  When I started blogging, there was Andrew Jones, Rudy Carrasco and myself blogging about the church and theological issues.  Other than them I learned a lot from Doc Searls, AKMA, Jason Kottke, Caterina Fake, Jeneanne Sessum, and Rebecca Blood.

I am not really sure why I keep posting here.  There never was a plan behind it.  I had no ambitions to be a thought leader, create a movement, make money, or achieve fame.  What I wanted was a place to explore ideas, keep track of interesting things and later on, share things with friends.  Hopefully I have done that.

I have also made some enemies.  One city councillor continues to block me on Twitter and called me an “first class asshole” over some comments I made last summer, one prominent Christian leader threatened to sue over comments, I think it’s a contributing factor for why my dad and I haven’t talked in eight years and more than one former colleague has questioned my Christianity over my more liberal views.   Still the site has brought more joy than angst so it’s all good.

There has been a lot of friends made as well.  Too many to list but thanks for the emails, comments, tweets, and time spent together over the last decade.   Hopefully there is an interesting link or two in the future.  Of course with entire companies moving from the open web to closed Facebook, I am now quite a bit behind the times but that’s the story of my life.

The StarPhoenixNot sure what the future brings.  I am writing a weekly column now at The StarPhoenix so some of my longer (and better written pieces) will be posted there.  I’ll still be posting links, sports (including my scheme to purchase the L.A. Dodgers) and some photos as well.

Thanks to everyone who reads this rather odd collection of links, rants, and articles.  You have been the ones that have made this so much fun.

HBR: Ten Reasons to Stop Apologizing for Your Online Life

Harvard Business Review lists ten reasons to stop trying to justify having a blog, using Twitter, and posting some photos to Flickr.

  1. When you commit to being your real self online, you discover parts of yourself you never dared to share offline.
  2. When you visualize the real person you’re about to e-mail or tweet, you bring human qualities of attention and empathy to your online communications.
    When you take the idea of online presence literally, you can experience your online disembodiment as a journey into your mind rather than out of your body.
  3. When you treat your Facebook connections as real friends instead of "friends", you stop worrying about how many you have and focus on how well you treat them.
  4. When you take your Flickr photos, YouTube videos and blog posts seriously as real art, you reclaim creative expression as your birthright.
  5. When you focus on creating real meaning with your time online, your online footprint makes a deeper impression.
  6. When you treat your online attention as a real resource, you invest your attention in the sites that reflect your values, helping those sites grow.
  7. When you spend your online time on what really matters to you, you experience your time online as an authentic reflection of your values.
  8. When you embrace online conversations as real, you imbue them with the power to change how you and others think and feel.
  9. When you talk honestly about the real joys and frustrations of the Internet, you can stop apologizing for your life online.

Bill Easum is blogging

I don’t know how I missed this but Bill Easum is blogging.  Bill’s writings have influenced my thinking a lot over the years and just the other day I was talking about his books to someone.  I have generally considered church consultants to be like snake oil salesmen but Bill’s firm and Lyle Schaller has been the exceptions to that rule for me. He is also on Twitter @billeasum

The Cabin Weblog

I used to host this site on my site but since I migrated to WordPress, it was just easier to host this at Blogspot.  After playing a bit with it, the cabin weblog is more or less online.  We wanted a place to post the changes that we are making over the last couple of years and since quite a few friends have used it this summer, we needed something that we can give to people to find Arlington Beach and also so they know what to bring along with them.  It is also a place for Wendy and I to post some links to some design and architecture sites and articles that we find interesting.