Tag Archives: Alberta

Next year

Well with all of my photos from Banff and Yoho National Park posted, I thought I would write what we are thinking of for next year.

The big difference is we are doing a short trip on July 1st long weekend to Yoho National Park to hike Lake O’Hara.  Lake O’Hara has very restricted access but is considered one of the best hiking areas in the world.   So the plan is to drive out and the camp in the rustic Lake O’Hara campground before hiking the trails for two days.

We will take a longer vacation later in the summer.  We will also take Marley along for this one.

Day 1: Drive to Banff, get out and hike up Tunnel Mountain.  Die a little on top.  Walk back down.  Get back into car and drive to Lake Louise campground.

Tunnel Mountain in Banff National Park

Basically we never did do this during this year’s vacation because my ankle was so swollen that it felt like it was going to snap.  I want to do this next year.   As for the campground, I loved the Johnston Canyon Campground but Lake Louise Campground is closer to Yoho National Park and there are no reservable spots in Yoho.

Day 2: Hike to Lake Agnes Tea House.  Hike up the Little Beehive and the Big  Beehive.

Another idea from this year that was derailed because of my ankle.  If all goes well, three mountain tops and one cup of tea in two days.  I am more excited about the mountain tops than I am the tea to be honest.

Day 3: Yoho: HIke to the the Twin Falls

Get up early and drive into Yoho and hike from Takakkaw Falls past the Angel’s Staircase to the Twin Falls.  Then back.

Day 4: Walk the Past Trail

It’s not a long trail but I have always wanted to hike the Walk the Past Trail in Yoho.  It is near the Spiral Tunnels and it is littered with the carnage of runaway trains and exploding boilers that plagued the Big Hill during it’s existence.  This history geek in me is looking forward to this.  Since it won’t take long, I plan to check out Emerald Lake in Yoho as well.

Day 5: Columbia Ice Fields

I haven’t spent anytime in Jasper National Park so this will be fun but we are planning to take the Columbia Ice Fields tour as we relocate camp from Lake Louise to the Columbia Ice Fields Campground.

Day 6: Hike to Wilcox Pass

One of the best hikes in Canada, this high alpine pass should be fun.

Day 7: Athabasca Falls and Exploring the town of Jasper.

Day 8: Mount Edith Cavell trail

Edith Cavall Trail in Jasper National Park

Day 9: Edmonton and then home.

Moraine Lake, Alberta

I should have posted these sooner.  When you take several thousand photos on a trip, you have to edit several thousand photos.  When I mean edit, I mean hit the delete key a lot.

In our last full day in Banff National Park, we planned to hike some of the trails around Moraine Lake.  Those plans were changed when almost all of the trails in the Valley of the Ten Peaks were closed because of grizzly bears.   That disappointed Wendy, Mark, and Oliver but I had a plan B, even if they didn’t know it yet.

As we drove up to Moraine Lake, the sign said the road was closed and three cars ahead of us did the U-turn and drove back down the road.  A Parks Canada employee walked up and waved us past the closed sign so upward we went.  It’s an amazing drive and show a forest that we had never seen before.

We finally got to the full parking lot and parked about a 300 metres down the road which was pretty good considering at times, that road has people parked on it for miles.

The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

After turning my back on Oliver for about a second, he thinks he is in the Logdrivers Waltz and is jumping from log to log to go up the rock pile.  Luckily the kid has skills and made it back to shore.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Canoes can be rented for about $60/hour or you can take a well maintained path to the stream/waterfall at the far side of the lake.  We decided to walk.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkIMGP3016

This is the end of the path but Wendy and Mark decided to test their luck and balance and keep going.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Marley decided to test her luck as well and wandered out into the water, fell in, got wet, hit her head and swallowed some water before getting out.  There was a Russian researcher there who had just gotten his permanent residency papers this week and was celebrating with his wife.  They loved Marley’s clumsiness and we had a great chat about the mountains, Trump, Putin, and dogs while waiting for Wendy and Mark to return.

The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkIMGP3063The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

I need to explain these photos.  Last year while at Sawback, I told the boys that there is a Cooper tradition of dunking you head into glacier waters the first time you head to a new lake or body of water.  There is no tradition, I just wanted to see if I could make them dunk their heads in the water.  This time Wendy and I were no so lucky as they made us dunk our heads in the freezing glacier water.Wendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Just before I did this, I think I said, “Mark hold my camera but no need to photograph this.”  He listens like his mother.

Solid hat don’t you think?

The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Did I mention I didn’t wear a hat in the Banff heat (and no shade) the day before.  I was burnt.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Me taking a photo of a person taking a photo.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Don’t worry, it wasn’t a real bear.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

While in the Gift Shop, I picked Wendy up a Moraine Lake t-shirt while Mark got her two bear figurines that made her day.  She was still on a high from seeing the black hear the day before.  It wasn’t quite as large as this one.

Lake Louise

We headed out to Lake Louise for the day while in Banff National Park.  We got up early from the Johnston Canyon Campground and headed down the Bow Valley Parkway.  The plan was to hike up to Lake Agnes Tea House but my ankle was still swollen, I was still running a fever from being taken off the medication for my ankle.  We got there in good time and got a good parking spot (Parks Canada staff running the parking lots makes it run  very smooth).  As we walked up the path to the Tea House, I realized that a combination of rain, a fever, and a messed up ankle, I needed to understand my limits.  We’ll head back up there next year.

Before anyone feels sorry for us, did I mention we were still on the shore of Lake Louise?  It’s pretty spectacular view and we were about to find out that our fellow tourists were pretty great.

Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkIMGP2683Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkIMGP2695Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkLake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkOliver at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper, Mark Cooper, and Oliver Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper, Mark Cooper, and Oliver Cooper at Lake Louise, Alberta in Banff National Park

From there we headed down the mountain and stopped at Laggan’s Mountain Bakery and Delicatessen

Laggan's Mountain Bakery and Delicatessan

Everyone I know that has been to Laggan’s raves about how great it is.  You have to see and smell it to believe it.  Wendy picked out some Jamaican Patties and got use some of the best pizza I have ever tasted.  The bakery is worth the stop if you are even close to Lake Louise.

Castle Mountain

After hiking up to Silverton Falls, we drove further down the Bow Valley Parkway until we got to the base of Castle Mountain and stopped at the site of the Castle Mountain Internment Camp used in World War I.  It’s not a proud part of Canada’s past.

Castle Mountain Internment Camp in Banff National Park

Life at the camp was brutal.  Rations were poor, abuse was widespread and some froze to death during the winters.  They were essentially used as slave labor to build the Banff National Park infrastructure.

From there we checked out the Castle Mountain lookout which had a Canadian Pacific rail line go by it.

Views of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National Park

I am not sure what happened here but both Mark and Oliver just stared for ages at Castle Mountain.  For Mark it was almost a spiritual experience.  Finally he goes, “So this is why you love the mountains.” 

Views of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National Park

Then as we were talking, you could hear the familiar sound of a eastbound Canadian Pacific train coming in the distance.

A Canadian Pacific train heads east along the Bow Valley near Castle Mountain in Banff National ParkA Canadian Pacific train heads east along the Bow Valley near Castle Mountain in Banff National ParkA Canadian Pacific train heads east along the Bow Valley near Castle Mountain in Banff National ParkA Canadian Pacific train heads east along the Bow Valley near Castle Mountain in Banff National ParkA Canadian Pacific train heads east along the Bow Valley near Castle Mountain in Banff National ParkA Canadian Pacific train heads east along the Bow Valley near Castle Mountain in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National ParkViews of Castle Mountain and the Bow Valley in Banff National Park

Johnston Canyon Campground

Well we are back from vacation in Banff National Park and later Yoho National Park.   It was a great week but once that almost didn’t happen.  A few weeks ago they took me off my antibiotics because they thought they had killed the infection (again) and of course we know what happened.  In three days I was overwhelmed with fevers and extremely sick just before the holidays.  So I was back on my medication but it takes weeks for it to catch up to the infection.

The day  before we were to leave, I was really sick.  It had gotten worse and I was really suffering.  I went to be knowing that all I wanted was to sleep for the next week.

I got up early last Sunday and felt even worse.  I talked to Wendy and said that her and the boys should go without me.

They loaded the car and went to leave.  I had gotten some sleep and felt a little better. I didn’t feel strong enough to go but I had some food and talked it over with Wendy and decided to go.  I did warn her that I may do nothing more than sleep all week.  She was okay with that.

We had intended to leave Saskatoon, contact some friends and grab some coffee as we passed through town.  Now we left Saskatoon really late and it was going to be a rush to get to the campground before nightfall.

Sadly we were very  early onto a horrible motorcycle crash.  Guy on a road bike, wet highway, looks like he lost control.  When we got there, he was lying on the highway and being held down.  It was a horrible sight but ambulance was on route and First Responders were already there.

We rolled in Johnston Canyon Campground around 9:00 p.m. and Mark and I rushed to set up the tents.

This was Wendy’s and mine tent.  I know it’s massive.  It is an eight person tent that I picked up at Walmart a few years ago.  I am not a big fan of Walmart tents but I bought some Nikwax Tent & Gear SolarProof and applied it.  The SolarProof protects the tent from UV radiation at higher altitudes while making it waterproof.  We did get some heavy rain a few days and nights and we never had a leak all week.  Several times I found myself laying in it and going, “this should be leaking” but it wasn’t.

Our tent at Johnston Canyon Campground in Banff National Park

The tent doesn’t come with a ground sheet.  So I decided to pick up some tarps.  I measured the tent spent $3 on tarps from Dollarama and used Gorilla Tape to fasten them together created one.  The ground sheet saves the bottom of the tent and acts as a bit of a vapor barrier between the tent and the ground.

A five person tent at Johnston Canyon Campground in Banff National Park

We had some tents already but my brother Lee gave this tent to the boys when he upgraded.  The 8 person tent served as home for Wendy and I while Mark and Oliver lived in the smaller five person tent.  It’s a three season tent with a big vestibule.  They loved having their own space.  The fact that it came from their uncle and aunt made it even cooler for them.

The only complaint was we never had a night where I felt 100% confident that we would not get rain.  Oliver really wanted to “sleep under the stars”.  Either that or he really wanted to see what else was going on while he slept in the tent.

An eight person tent is too big for two people but one can stand up in it and there was room for our queen sized air mattress.  Since I had a dog sleeping in my arms every single night, all of the space we could get was needed.

I had purchased Wendy a hammock for Mother’s Day.  I gave strict orders to the boys that this was Wendy’s hammock.

Views of the Johnston Canyon Campground in Banff National Park

I had my hammock as well.

Views of the Johnston Canyon Campground in Banff National Park

According to this, I was late giving the edict that this was MY hammock.  By the time I went to lay in it, it had already been infested.

Views of the Johnston Canyon Campground in Banff National Park

You have no idea how hard it was to get them out of this tent.  There was one of them in it the entire time we were there.  Mark called it a Bear Taco.

This is Wendy getting everything set up.

Views of the Johnston Canyon Campground in Banff National Park

Something is wrong with this photo.  There are only three lawn chairs.  Obviously they were packed when I wasn’t planning to come out.

Views of the Johnston Canyon Campground in Banff National Park

Wendy had some help from Marley in setting things up.

Views of the Johnston Canyon Campground in Banff National Park

This is the view from the back of the campsite.  Just through the trees is the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway which thrilled all of us when it rolled through between five and ten times a day/night.  Some might have found it bothersome but we loved it.  The railway were such a big part of the story of Banff National Park, it was cool to hear them roll through, even if it didn’t make for the best alarm clock.

Views of the Johnston Canyon Campground in Banff National Park

I had originally wanted to stay in the Castle Mountain Campground because of it’s location but you can’t reserve there.  In hindsight staying in a place with a hot shower was the right decision.

There were only four showers for 100+ campsites but it was enough.  There was a bit of a lineup in the evenings but most people took really quick showers (although Wendy waited as a women took a 40 minute shower one morning).  The one oddity of the campground was there was two plugins in each washroom which were always being used as people charged everything from laptops computer to cameras and phones.

Parks Canada staff kept the washrooms immaculate although one of them said, “It’s not that hard, people are really good here.”  I’ll take her word for it but the fact remains those washrooms were the cleanest of any campground we had ever seen.

The campground wasn’t that large and was extremely quiet.  We were surrounded by Americans and Europeans for most of it.  It was hectic in the morning as everyone got up and got going, then it was silent for for most of the day as everyone was gone.  It got slightly busier at night but mostly people flaked out after a long day of hiking.  There were two cycling clubs there who were working out together in the mountains all day long.  Most of the noise was people slowly cycling by.  If you are looking for a nice campground, this is it.

Johnston Canyon in Banff National Park

While in Banff National Park, Wendy and I took the boys up to Johnston Canyon which was insanely busy.  The parking lot was packed and by the time we left, people were parking over a kilometre in both ways down the Bow Valley Parkway.   We had plans to take the boys to the upper waterfalls.

So as the sign says, it is a 1 km hike to the first falls.  Yet when I started the Map My Hike app on my iPhone, it said that it was 4k with a return hike. 

Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National ParkJohnston Canyon hike in Banff National ParkJohnston Canyon hike in Banff National ParkJohnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park

I think I have met these three people before.

Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National ParkJohnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park

They enjoyed the walk.  They weren’t tired but the progress was at a standstill because there was a group taking selfie’s up ahead.

Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National ParkJohnston Canyon hike in Banff National ParkJohnston Canyon hike in Banff National ParkJohnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park

This is my favorite shot from the hike.

The hike along Johnston Canyon in Banff National Park

Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National ParkJohnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park

A Parks Canada employee has what looks to be a long and wet day ahead of him.

Parks Canada employee preparing for what looks to be a long days work at Johnston Canyon in Prince Albert National Park

IMGP0396Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park

This is the legendary lower falls of Johnston Canyon.  We had planned to go to the upper falls but as the photos show, the crowds were brutal and the antibiotics I had to deal with the infection in my ankle hadn’t beaten the infection back very far.  Combined it meant that it would be a long hike and since we are coming back next summer to hike to the inkpots, it wasn’t a big deal to call it a day and dodge the selfie sticks back to the car.

Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National ParkWendy Cooper at Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park

I think we can all agree that I nailed this picture of a chipmunk.

 Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park

Did I mention that the trail was packed.  This is the main reason why we didn’t go to the second falls.  So many people (and my ankle was really hurting me).  Also, most of the people we passed on the trail were looking at their phones.  Apparently world class scenery and nature doesn’t compete well with Angry Birds.

 Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park Johnston Canyon hike in Banff National Park

If you want to see more photos from Johnston Canyon, check out the full set on Flickr.

Sawback Picnic Area in Banff National Park

Sawback is a small picnic area on the Bow Valley Parkway between Banff and Johnston Canyon.  It used to be small and has gotten smaller since Parks Canada has moved the tables near to the roadside turn off and allowed the vegetation to take over old picnic areas.

Growing up, it was my favorite place in the world.  We used to take a yearly trip from Calgary (and later Saskatoon) to Johnston Canyon and then picnic at Sawback.  I was looking forward to taking the boys there and was quite disappointed when all there was left was some picnic tables near the parking lot.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

It wasn’t the picnic areas that make it so great, it was the babbling brook of glacier runoff that make it so much fun to explore as a kid.  I knew that didn’t go anywhere so I followed an overgrown trail into the bush and 50 feet into it I found the brook.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Mark and Oliver did exactly what I did year ago and this jump across it and get all wet.

Sawback Picnic area in Banff National ParkMark and Oliver at the Sawback Picnic area in Banff National ParkMark and Oliver at the Sawback Picnic area in Banff National Park

This shot was right after I had scolded the boys about making faces every time I tried to take their photo.

Mark and Oliver at the Sawback Picnic area in Banff National Park

So while the picnic tables placement kind of sucks, we will return in 2016 with a proper picnic blanket and food.

Sawback Picnic area in Banff National ParkWendy at the Sawback Picnic area in Banff National ParkA forced family photo at the Sawback Picnic area in Banff National Park

I told Mark that there is a sacred Cooper tradition of dunking one’s head into the glacier water that ran out of the Sawback mountain range.  He put his hands in, screamed from the cold…

Mark dunking his head into freezing glacier water at the Sawback Picnic area in Banff National ParkMark dunking his head into freezing glacier water at the Sawback Picnic area in Banff National Park

 

And dunked his head into it.

Mark dunking his head into freezing glacier water at the Sawback Picnic area in Banff National Park

After he got out and was struggling with hypothermia did I tell him that he was the first of the Cooper’s to do such a thing.  Yes, I am a horrible father.

All of the snapshots I took at Sawback can be found in their album on Flickr.

How the West Was Once

After two days of being up at 4:45 a.m., I feel like I am slacking and sleeping in today.  It’s almost 7 a.m. 

Today we are heading to Heritage Park.  I haven’t been there since I was in Grade 4.  Much as stayed the same but a lot has changed.  That was so long ago that the school I attended for Grade 4 has closed.

Before we go to Heritage Park, I need to take Mark to Chinook Centre so we can hit up the Apple Store and he can get a new iPod Nano.   His died and then I leant him my old iPod Touch which he then dropped.  So here we go again.  I wonder if he can get an Otter Box for it.

Oliver doesn’t know there is a Lego store in that mall but I can’t see us walking by it and not going in.

After that it is to the park where we will wander around aimlessly and eat homemade food, ride a steam engine, take a cruise on a paddle wheeler, and see how Calgary was once.

The Rockies

Another obscenely early morning around here.  Wendy posted late last night about the trip out here.

I am waiting for the crew to get ready before we head downstairs to grab breakfast and then hit the road to Banff National Park today.  We are taking the old highway through Cochrane along a winding road to Canmore.   From there we will make a quick detour into Banff for some fresh bread and food before heading to Johnston Canyon where will hike the trail to the second large waterfall.  It isn’t so much of a hike then a stroll.  It’s also a great place to people watch as there are tourists from all over the globe there and they are fascinated by a lot of things (like squirrels) that we find mundane.

From there we are heading to a picnic area called Sawback where we will have a quick picnic lunch, then proceed up the Bow Valley Parkway until we get to Lake Louise.  Along the way we are checking out a campground that we plan to stay at next year.  It looks good online but it’s always nice to see it first hand.

After we explore the Chateau Lake Louise, we are heading back to Banff where the Banff Gondola and Cave and Basin National Historic site wait for us.  After dinner the plan is to see the Bow Falls chill out (or warm up) in the Upper Banff Hot Springs before heading back to Calgary.

The Cave and Basin National Historic Site is one of my favourite spots on earth.  I loved going there as a kid and I can’t wait until I can show Wendy, Mark, and Oliver the site.  As for the Chateau Lake Louise, it was there that I proposed to Wendy so it will be fun heading back there.