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Failure

  • He who has never failed somewhere, that man cannot be great. Failure is the true test of greatness. — F. D. Mattiesen
  • Slump? I ain’t in no slump; I just ain’t hitting. — Yogi Berra

Faith

  • I am looking for a lot of men who have an infinite capacity to not know what can’t be done." — Henry Ford
  • To love a person means to see him as God intended him to be. — Dostoevsky
  • If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, infinite. — William Blake Source: Little Zen Companion, Schiller.
  • Love means to love that which is unlovable, or it is no virtue at all; forgiving means to pardon that which is unpardonable, or it is no virtue at all. — G. K. Chesterton
  • The glances over cocktails that seemed to be so sweet,
  • Do not seem quite so amorous over shredded wheat. — Benny Fields
  • Faith is not belief without proof but trust without reservation. — Elton Trueblood
  • The glances over cocktails that seemed to be so sweet,
    Do not seem quite so amorous over shredded wheat. — Benny Fields
  • Faith is to believe what we do not see, and the reward of this faith is to see what we believe. — Augustine
  • I had rather walk, as I do, in daily terror of eternity, than feel that this was only a children’s game in which all the contestants would get equally worthless prizes in the end. — T. S. Eliot
  • True faith goes into operation when there are not answers. — Elisabeth Elliot
  • Faith is to believe what we do not see, and the reward of this faith is to see what we believe. — Augustine
  • I had rather walk, as I do, in daily terror of eternity, than feel that this was only a children’s game in which all the contestants would get equally worthless prizes in the end. — T. S. Eliot
  • True faith goes into operation when there are not answers. — Elisabeth Elliot
  • The prisoner who had lost his faith in the future — his future — was doomed. With his loss of belief in the future, he also lost his spiritual hold; he let himself decline and become subject to mental and physical decay. — Viktor Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1985), p. 85.
  • Faith is the heroic effort of your life. You fling yourself in reckless confidence on God. God has ventured all in Jesus Christ to save us. Not He wants us to venture our all in abandoned confidence in Him… The real meaning of eternal life is a life that can face anything it has face without wavering… Again and again, you will get up to what Jesus Christ wants, and every time, you will turn back when it comes to that point, until you abandon resolutely… Jesus Christ demands that you risk everything you hold by common sense — and leap into what He says… Christ demands of the man who trusts Him the same reckless spirit… that is daring enough to step out of the crowd and bank his faith on the character of God. — Oswald Chambers
  • A real Christian is an odd number. He feels supreme love for One whom he has never seen; talks familiarly every day to Someone he cannot see; expects to go to heaven on the virtue of Another; empties himself in order to be filled; admits he is wrong so he cannot be declared right; goes down in order to get up; is strongest when he is weakest; richest when he is poorest and happiest when he feels the worst. He dies so he can live; forsakes in order to have; gives away so he can keep; sees the invisible; hears the inaudible; and knows that which passes knowledge. — A. W. Tozer
  • My becoming a Christian upset (Ted Turner) very much &ldots; for good reason. He’s my husband and I chose not to discuss it with him, because he would have talked me out of it. He’s a debating champion – Jane Fonda, reported by Ken Auletta in NEW YORKER magazine
  • "I had absolutely no warning about it. (Jane) didn’t tell me she was thinking about doing it. She just came home and said, ‘I’ve become a Christian.’ Before that, she was not a religious person. That’s a pretty big change for your wife of many years to tell you. That’s a shock… . Obviously, we weren’t communicating very well at that time." – CNN founder Ted Turner in NEW YORKER magazine

Fame

  • "Big egos are big shields for lots of empty space. Diana Black
  • "Pride gets no pleasure out of having something, only out of having more of it than the next man." C.S. Lewis, 20th-century British novelist and scholar
  • "Half of the harm that is done in this world is due to people who want to feel important. . .  They do not mean to do harm. . . . They are absorbed in the endless struggle to think well of themselves." — T.S. Eliot, Nobel Prize-winning 20th-century Anglo-American poet
  • "When dealing with people, remember you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but with creatures bristling with prejudice and motivated by pride and vanity." — Dale Carnegie, 20th-century American motivational writer
  • "Nothing is so commonplace as to wish to be remarkable." Unknown
  • “If you let your head get too big, it’ll break your neck” Elvis Presley, 20th-century American celebrity singer
  • "A free society is one where it is safe to be unpopular." Adlai Stevenson II, 20th-century American politician, presidential candidate
  • "When you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to reform.” Mark Twain, 19th-century American humorist, author and journalist
  • I value solid popularity the esteem of good men for good action. I despise the bubble popularity that is won without merit and lost without crime. Thomas Hart Benton, 18th/19th-century American writer and U.S. senator from Missouri
  • He that falls in love with himself will have no rivals. Benjamin Franklin, 18th century American Founding Father, inventor and statesman
  • When I hear a man applauded by the mob I always feel a pang of pity for him. All he has to do to be hissed is to live long enough. H. L. Mencken, 20th-century American journalist and humorist
  • "Vanity plays lurid tricks with our memory."  Joseph Conrad, 19th/20th-century Nobel Prize-winning Polish-English author
  • No man is a hero to his valet. Mme. Cornuel, 17th-century Parisian hostess

Family

  • A healthy family is sacred territory. –Unknown
  • He is happiest, be he king or peasant, who finds his peace in his home. — Goethe
  • When you look at your life, the greatest happinesses are the family happinesses. — Dr. Joyce Brothers
  • The children despise their parents until the age of forty, when they suddenly become just like them — thus preserving the system. — Quentin Crewe
  • Healthy families remind each other of their goodness; unhealthy families remind each other of their failings. — Matthew Fox
  • I never envied Elvis his mansion and all that. Al those boys — Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison — they all lost their wives, their families. People say, "What happened to you, Carl? All of them went on to superstardom. Where’d you go?" I say, "I went home." And that’s a good place to be. — Carl Perkins, Rockabilly singer (quote in Insight, Dec. 9, 1996, p. 33)
  • No matter how much the cats fight, there always seem to be plenty of kittens. –Abraham Lincoln

Fantasy

  • To be matter of fact about the world is to blunder into fantasy — and dull fantasy at that, as the real world is strange and wonderful. –Robert A. Heinlein

Fathers

  • By profession I am a soldier and take great pride in that fact, but I am prouder, infinitely prouder, to be a father. A soldier destroys in order to build; the father only builds, never destroys. The one has the potentialities of death; the other embodies creation and life. And while the hordes of death are mighty, the battalions of life are mightier still." — Douglas MacArthur, "Reminiscences"
  • The most important thing a father can do for his children is to love their mother. — Theodore M. Hesburgh
  • A son is a son till he takes a wife,
    But a daughter’s a daughter for the rest of her life.
  • Look up "father" in the dictionary. It comes right after "fathead" and just before "fatigue."

Fatigue

Fears

  • Fear is the mind-killer and unacknowledged fear is the worst kind. — Lawrence Block
  • Do the thing you fear and the death of fear is certain. — Emerson
  • Fear always springs from ignorance. — Emerson
  • Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear — not absence of fear. — Mark Twain
  • Carl Reiner:"What was the main mode of transportation 2000 years ago?"
  • Mel Brooks:"Fear!" — The 2000 Year Old Man
  • The trick is not to rid your stomach of butterflies, but to make them fly in formation. — Unknown
  • Aelurophobia – A fear of cats.
    Amathaphobia – A fear of dust.
    Kainotophobia – A fear of change or of new places.
    Kakorrhaphiophobia – A fear of doing anything because of the chance of failure.
    Nyctophobia – A fear of night and darkness.
    Ochlophobia – A fear of crowds.
    Pyrophobia – A fear of fire.
    Zoophobia – A fear of animals.
  • Fear — of the Future
  • Action conquers fear. — Peter N. Zarlenga
  • Feel the fear and do it anyway. — Susan Feffers
  • The important thing is this: To be able to at any moment to sacrifice what we are for what we could become. — Charles du Bois
  • The greatest tragedy in life is that most people spend their entire lives indefinitely preparing to live. — Paul Tournier
  • We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of lie is when adults are afraid of the light. — Plato

Film

  • No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen. –Minor White, Photographer

Finances

  • I never talk to brokers or analysts… Wall Street is the only place he people ride to in a Rolls Royce to get advice from those who take the subway. — Financier Warren Buffett

Finding God

  • There are three kinds of people: those who have sought God and found him, and these are reasonable and happy; those who seek God and have not yet found him, and these are reasonable and unhappy; and those who neither seek God nor find him, and these are unreasonable and unhappy. — Blaise Pascal

Fishing

  • There is a fine line between fishing and just standing on the shore like an idiot. — Stephen Wright

Fitness

  • "How long does getting thin take?" Pooh asked anxiously. –A. A. Milne

Flow

  • The master in the art of living makes little distinction between his work and his play, his labor and his leisure, his mind and his body, his information and his recreation, his love and his religion. He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence at whatever he does, leaving others to decide whether he is working or playing. To him he’s always doing both. — James Michener

Focus

  • Professor C. Northcote Parkinson has pointed out in one of his delightful satires that the quickest way to get rid of an inconvenient superior is to make a world traveler out of him. The jet plane is indeed overrated as a management tool. A great many trips have to be made; but a junior can make most of them. — Peter Drucker, The Effective Executive
  • Build on your strengths and your weaknesses will be irrelevant. — Peter F. Drucker
  • I am to bless the world through what I am. — William Makepeace Thackeray
  • The ultimate of being successful is the luxury of giving yourself the time to do what you want to do. — Leontyne Price
  • What an immense power over life is the poser of posing distinct aims. The voice, the dress, the look, the very motions of a person, define and alter when he or she begins to live for a reason. — Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
  • Here is where I should be." — Isak Dinesen, Out of Africa
  • Nothing contributes to much to tranquilize the mind as a steady purpose — a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye. — Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
  • Anyone can do any amount of work, provided it isn’t the work he or she is supposed to be doing at that time. — Robert Benchley
  • He is most fatigued who knows not what to do. — N. Boileau
  • There are just two questions to ask to attain success in business: First, "What business am I in?" Second, "How’s business?" — Peter Drucker
  • If there is a sin against life, it consists perhaps not so much in despairing of life as in hoping for another life and in eluding the implacable grandeur of this life. — Albert Camus
  • Either you let your life slip away by not doing the things you want to do, or you get up and do them. — Carl Ally
  • Men give me some credit for genius. All the genius I have lies in this: When I have a subject at hand I study it profoundly. Day and night it is before me. I explore it in all its bearings. My mind becomes pervaded with it. Then the effort which I have made is what people are pleased to call the fruit of genius. It is instead the fruit of labor and thought. — Alexander Hamilton
  • Take your passion and make it happen. — Song lyric from the movie Flashdance
  • The crime which bankrupts men and nations is that of turning aside from one’s main purpose to serve a job here and there. — Emmerson
  • What do I really want? This is one of the most important questions you will ever ask yourself. Spell out your desires. — Alfred A. Montapert
  • Your work is to discover your work, and then, with all your heart, to give yourself to it. — Buddha
  • We do not grow by knowing all of the answers, but rather by living with the questions. — Max DePree
  • A whale is as unique as a cactus. But don’t ask a whale to survive Death Valley. We all have special gifts. Where we use them and how determines whether we actually complete something. — Max DePree (Leadership is an Art, p. 145)
  • First and foremost, find out what it is you’re about, and be that. Be what you are and don’t lost it… It’s very hard to be who we are, because it doesn’t seem to be what anyone wants. — Norman Lear
  • Upon close examination it usually turns out that the vision did not originate with the leader personally, but rather from others. — Bennis and Nanus
  • There is no man living who cannot do more than he thinks he can. — Henry Ford
  • Great minds have purposes; others have wishes. — Washington Irving
  • To be nobody but yourself in a world which is doing its best to make you everybody else — means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight and never stop fighting. — e. e. cummings
  • Trust yourself. Create the kind of self that you will be happy to live with all your life. Make the most of yourself by fanning the tiny, inner sparks of possibility into the flames of achievement. — Foster C. Mc Cellan
  • Build on your strengths and your weaknesses will be irrelevant. — Peter F. Drucker
  • Fear not that life shall come to an end, but rather that it shall never have a beginning. — John Henry Cardinal Newman
  • Being a minister is just reminding people over and over, and then reminding them again, of what is most important in life. — Norman Vincent Peale
  • The butterfly counts not months but moments, and has time enough. — Rabindranath Tagore
  • A whale is as unique as a cactus. But don’t ask a whale to survive Death Valley. We all have special gifts. Where we use them and how determines whether we actually complete something. — Max DePree (Leadership is an Art, p. 145)
  • Every man has his own destiny; the only imperative is to follow it, to accept it, no matter where it leads him. — Henry Miller
  • There’s something happening here.
    What it is ain’t exactly clear. — Buffalo Springfield
  • I always wanted to be somebody, but I should have been more specific. — Lily Tomlin
  • There is no inherent problem in our desire to escalate our goals, as long as we enjoy the struggle along the way. — Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience
  • If there is a sin against life, it consists perhaps not so much in despairing of life as in hoping for another life and in eluding the implacable grandeur of this life. — Albert Camus
  • To be nobody but yourself in a world which is doing its best to make you everybody else — means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight and never stop fighting.
    — e. e. cummings

Football

  • Football combines two of the worst things about American life. It is violence punctuated by committee meetings. — George Will

Forgiveness

  • The noblest vengeance is to forgive. — English Proverb
  • if you have made mistakes… there is always another chance for you… you may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing we call ‘failure’ is not the falling down, but the staying down. — Mary Pickford
  • Judgements are like the wax on grandma’s preserves.
  • To be a Christian means to forgive the inexcusable, because God has forgiven the inexcusable in you. C.S. Lewis, "On Forgiveness," in The Weight of Glory, Collier/MacMillan, 1980
  • Christians are not necessarily more moral than anyone else in the world, just more forgiven. — Joy Davidman
  • Love is an act of endless forgiveness. — Peter Ustinov
  • The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong." — Mahatma Gandhi
  • The Italian novelist Ignazio Silone wrote about a revolutionary hunted by the police. In order to hide him, his comrades, dressed him in the garb of a priest and sent him to a remote village in the foothills of the Alps. Word got out, and soon a long line of peasants appeared at his door, full of stories of their sins and broken lives. The "priest" protested and tried to turn them away, to no avail. He had no recourse but to sit and listen to the stories of people starving for grace.  What’s So Amazing About Grace, p. 15,
  • I refuse to let any man belittle my soul by making me hate him. — Booker T. Washington
  • If you are distressed by anything external, the pain is not due to the thing itself but to your own estimate of it; and this you have the power to revoke at any moment. — Marcus Aurelius
  • It is not events that disturb the minds of men, but the view they take of them. — Epictetus
  • Tact is the knack of making a point without making an enemy. — Howard W. Newton
  • He who cannot forgive another breaks the bridge over which he must pass himself. George Herbert
  • The first and the only person to be healed by forgiveness is the person who does the forgiving. Lewis Smedes
  • Forgiveness is remembering the past that it might be forgotten.Paul Tillich
  • The rule of reprimand is that you have only thirty seconds to share your feelings. And when it’s over, it’s over. — Ken Blanchard
  • Love means to love that which is unlovable, or it is no virtue at all; forgiving means to pardon that which is unpardonable, or it is no virtue at all. — G. K. Chesterton
  • He who cannot forgive another breaks the bridge over which he must pass himself. — George Herbert
  • In the deserts of the heart let the healing fountain start,
    In the prison of his days teach the free man how to praise. — W.H. Auden

Formality

  • The longer the title, the less important the job. — George McGovern

Friends

  • Friendship consists in forgetting what one gives, and remembering what one receives. — Alexandre Dumas
  • So long as we are loved by others, I should say that we are almost indispensable; and no man is useless while he has a friend. — Robert Lewis Stevenson
  • With such a comrade, such a friend, I fain would walk till journeys end. Through summer sunshine, winter rain, and then? — farewell, we shall meet again. — Henry van Dyke
  • After the friendship of God, a friends affection is the greatest treasure here below.
  • In prosperity our friends know us; in adversity we know our friends. — Churton Collins
  • The art of friendship is more like wrestling than dancing. — Marcus Aurelius
  • Between friends there is not need for justice. — Aristotle
  • Those who have successful friendships allow their loved one room. Rather than possessing their friends, they try to help them expand and grow and become free. — Alan Loy Guinnis
  • Nobody has so many friends that he can afford to lose one. — Edward Abbey

Friendship

  • Oh, the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person;
    having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words, but to pour them all out,
    just as they are, chaff and grain together, knowing that a faithful hand
    will take and sift them, keep what is worth keeping, and then, with the breath of kindness, blow the rest away. — George Elliot
  • "New friends are silver, but old friends are gold." ” Unknown
  • "When eating a fruit, think of the person who planted the tree." Vietnamese saying
  • "Never esteem anything as of advantage to you that will make you break your word or lose your self-respect."  Marcus Aurelius
  • "Loyalty oaths increase the number of liars.” Noel Peattie
  • "Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all others." Cicero (Marcus Tullius), Roman orator, philosopher and statesman
  • If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principle difference between a dog and a man." Mark Twain, 19th-century American humorist, author and journalist
  • "Friendship, like credit, is highest where it is not used.” Elbert Hubbard, 19th/20th-century American entrepreneur and philosopher (founder of Roycroft)
  • "Friends may come and go, but enemies accumulate." Thomas Jones
  • "If you don’t appreciate it, you don’t deserve it." Terry Josephson, 20th/21st-century motivational author

Friendliness

  • We envision the church as an idealized family, we are not very capable of welcoming the stranger. When family is the only metaphor we use, people with whom we cannot achieve intimacy, or with whom we do not want to be intimate, are squeezed out. Since intimacy often depends on social and economic similarities, church then becomes a place of retreat rather than true hospitality. Such a church does everything in his power to eliminate the strange and cultivate the familiar. Such a church can neither welcome the stranger nor allow the stranger in each of us to emerge. — Molly Marshall (quoted from The Other Side, Nov.-Dec., 1996, p. 57)

Freedom

  • Experience should teach us to be most on our guard to protect liberty when the Government’s purposes are beneficent.  Men born to freedom are naturally alert to repel invasion of their liberty by evil-minded rulers.  The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding. –Justice Louis D. Brandeis, dissenting,   Olmstead v. United States, 277 US 479 (1928)
  • He that would make his own liberty secure must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself. –Thomas Paine
  • They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. –Benjamin Franklin
  • The First Amendment is often inconvenient. But that is besides the point.  Inconvenience does not absolve the government of its obligation to tolerate speech. –Justice Anthony Kennedy, in 91-155
  • If you cannot be free, be as free as you can be. — Emerson
  • Men are not prisoners of fate, but only prisoners of their own minds. Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • I disapprove of what you say, but will defend to the death your right to say it. –Voltaire
  • A free society is a place where it’s safe to be unpopular. –Adlai Stevenson

Frustrations

  • I used to work in a fire hydrant factory. You couldn’t park anywhere near the place. — Steven Wright
  • Whenever man comes up with a better mousetrap, nature immediately comes up with a better mouse. — James Carswell Source: Harper Book of Quotations, Harper 1993

Fulfillment

A champion runner doesn’t even know he’s in a race. He runs because he love it. — Unknown

Fun

  • All I wanna do is have some fun, I’ve got a feeling I’m not the only one. — Sheryl Crow, 1994
  • If you are too busy to laugh, you are too busy. — saying
  • I wake up every morning determined both to change the world and have one hell of a good time. Sometimes this makes planning the day a little difficult. — E. B. White
  • All happy families are alike. All unhappy families are peculiar in their own ways. — Anna Karenina (first line of this novel)

Future

  • Future shock is the dizzying orientation brought on by the premature arrival of the future. — Alvin Toffler
  • The future is called "perhaps." — Tennessee Williams
  • The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams. — Eleanor Roosevelt
  • The future ain’t what it used to be. — Arthur C. Clarke, The Adventure of Tomorrow
  • The future just isn’t what it used to be. — Unknown
  • The target now is to invent a new game." — Phil Knight, founder of Nike
  • The greatest thing in the world is not so much where we stand as in what direction we’re moving. — Oliver Wendell Holmes
  • The best way to predict the future is to create it. — Alan Kay, former of research, Apple Computer
  • The easy way out usually leads back in. The faster/cheaper mentality must be replaced because it will not add up to better in the future, and, it may add up to no future! — Peter Senge

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