Brazilian soccer star’s Olympic warning: ‘Stay home’

This could  be a bad summer for Brazil’s Tourism agency

Some tourists gathered along a winding path here on a Thursday in early May, watching the waves from the Atlantic, hoping for a big one. The surf was so high that red flags were planted on the beach below, so even the cariocas – the locals – stayed on the sand. It was only a couple of weeks ago that one of the waves leapt up to a newly built portion of this path, and crumpled it like a wet cracker. At least two people died; their bodies were fished out of the surf by helicopters and laid onto the beach below.

The tourists hung out near a food cart with a bright umbrella, and the owner stepped outside and got a visitor’s attention. He gestured with his hand in an up-and-over motion. It was clear what he meant: every now and then a wave crashed over the ledge, and where the tourists were standing wasn’t quite safe. He returned to work; the tourists stayed where they were. The waves kept coming, higher and higher.

Brazil is a precarious place these days.

“Things are getting uglier here every day,” Brazilian soccer star Rivaldo wrote on his Instagram account Sunday. “I advise everyone with plans to visit Brazil for the Olympics in Rio – to stay home. You’ll be putting your life at risk here. … Only God can change the situation in our Brazil.”

The situation in Brazil right now looks like this: The economy is crashing and no one knows quite what to do about it. The Zika virus has caused paralysis and harrowing birth defects. The Olympics are less than three months away and that will bring security concerns. It will also bring some embarrassment, as the local Guanabara Bay is filthy and rancid. The beach surrounding it has no people, but rather empty cans and vials and diapers. It was supposed to be cleaned; it might never be cleaned.

Perhaps most troubling of all: an impeachment process in the midst of a corruption crisis leaves Brazil’s political future completely uncertain. Plan A has failed and there is no Plan B. When the Olympic flame arrived here on May 3, it was met by dueling protests – one side against a “coup” and another in favor of impeachment. A schoolteacher who watched the torch relay voiced a common wish: new elections. But who is worthy to win? No one has inspired any trust. The most popular politician is someone nicknamed “Tiririca.” He’s a professional clown. His campaign slogan was, “It can’t get any worse.”

So yeah… that “best games ever” seems out of reach.

Is Phil Jackson too lazy to run the New York Knicks?

Chris Mannix of The Vertical thinks so

Is Phil Jackson too lazy to run the New York Knicks?It’s time to accept a certain reality: Jackson just isn’t cut out for this gig. The world has gotten bigger, and the talent pool has grown with it. An NBA executive must be a tireless workaholic, not an ex-coach who acts like his 11 championship rings make scouring the globe for talent beneath him. Jackson nailed Kristaps Porzingis, a transformative 7-foot-3 big man who will revolutionize the center position. Yet the frontrunner for the Knicks’ coaching job (incumbent Kurt Rambis) has suggested Porzingis play some small forward while staying loyal to a system (the triangle) that doesn’t seem to suit the young star.

The Knicks don’t have a pick next month, which is all the more reason for Jackson to put in the extra work. No asset is more attainable than a second-round pick, particularly from the handful of teams (Boston, New Orleans, Denver) with a few of them. Finding NBA talent there is difficult, but every year yields a Norman Powell, a Jordan Clarkson, an Allen Crabbe, and it’s often the most relentless executives who grab them.

Now is the time for Jackson to marshal his resources, not cruise through the Plains States on an ill-timed break. There’s video to be dissected, college coaches to be called, international scouts with information to be bled dry. Free agency – Jackson’s rebuilding method of choice – has changed, evolved. The magnetic pull to big markets has weakened, replaced by a marketplace of players fueled by a desire to win. New York, with its instability, its annual failures, just isn’t where the elite talent is looking to play.

I agree with Mannix, I have never liked the hiring of Jackson for this very reason.  Jackson may be a great communicator and teacher but that doesn’t always make you a great talent evaluator or manager.  Then there is his insistence to run the Triangle offense with a team that is not well suited to run it.

Mother’s Day

It’s Mother’s Day today. You can see what we did on Wendy’s blog.  It was a great day and I am glad we had it but I wanted to write a bit about my mom.

Mom died in 1998 of brain cancer.  I was attending the University of Saskatchewan and I remember walking about of the U of S and going to the RUH where they kept her in palliative care because it was so much easier for my sister and I.  I would walk out of class and sit beside her for weeks hoping for whatever conversation she could have.  It wasn’t much.  By the time she was in the hospital, the tumor was winning and she treated me like I was a child.  She did that to my brother and sister as well.

It was a weird time.  Go to the hospital, go to class, back to hospital over lunch, back to RUH, grab supper at Alexander’s, then back to hospital.  It was like that for weeks.  I don’t remember feeling a lot of emotion at the time, she was dying and there wasn’t anything we could do about it and plus someone had to crack jokes around her and appear that we had our crap together as her kids.

Wendy and I were there with my sister when Mom took her last breath.  We called in a nurse because no one had died in front of me at that time, the nurse came in, assured us that she wasn’t in pain and then the doctor confirmed she was dead.  We cleaned out her room of personal belongings, paid for parking at RUH and drove to Lee’s high school where I told him that our mom had just died and then drove him home.

Wendy had called her parents to let them know that Marion had died but they were too busy interrupting her about how muddy the floors were in Brandon, Manitoba to listen.  It’s a conversation that still makes Wendy angry.

After that was done, it was up to getting ready for the funeral.  Mom wanted the burial to be first and then the funeral.  So we buried her and then went to the Saskatoon Inn for brunch.  Later was the funeral and I gave the eulogy.  My mom was a life long Progressive Conservative voter and proud of it except she had a lack of judgement in 1968 and voted for Trudeau.  She used to joke about this skeleton in the closet.  When I told that story at her funeral, someone  I didn’t know got up and walked out at that point.  No matter who that person was that walked out, my mom would have wanted that story told.

There was the funeral and the condolences and then we went home an ordered Vern’s Pizza.  It was really hot and wrecked the coffee table finish, something that bugged me for years every time I looked at it.  Then it was done.   I had felt nothing. 

I didn’t feel a thing until about a three months later when I was at home alone.  Wendy would work evenings and the phone would ring and for a split second, I would think it was mom.  I never knew how to deal with it.  I am a INTJ with Myers Briggs which means that I am what they call an underdeveloped feeler.  I don’t really under my feeling and it doesn’t understand me but the pain and loss was incredible.  Every day that phone would ring it was a reminder that she was gone. 

Stuff kept falling apart with the family.  My brother and sister were living together and struggling.  I didn’t know how to help.  All our lives lurched along for a while but we all seemed lost.  My sister and brother went to live with my father.  Wendy and I stayed here.  I knew it was the wrong thing but I couldn’t persuade anyone of it.

Life changed for my mom the day before my brother was born when my dad walked out for another women.  She was devastated and crushed.  She told me what happened a month or so later.  I still remember every word from that conversation.  I was eight.

All of our lives changed on that day.  It never got easier for us.  I was messed up, my sister was seriously ill and my brother was just days old.  There was court battles and visitation rights and financial struggles that never ended.  It took me years to get my head around what happened and what it did to me.  My mom bore the brunt of it.  Instead of making it easier for her, I made it much harder.  Sadly we never had the kind of relationship either of us wanted.  I was a rebellious oldest son and she needed me to to be a better and more responsible one, characteristics I came by later in life.  I needed to her to let me be a kid once in while and be a kid, something that the stress of the finances and her depression couldn’t let her do.

Despite me being, well a teenager, she was the one that would encourage me to be a better writer.  She read more short stories of mine growing up than any parent should ever endure.   Mom never really understood my desire to create.  She was trained as a math teacher which was about study and discipline, things I was never good at until later.  In many ways, I was the opposite of her.

Being the opposite of her, she saw a lot of my father in me.  To be honest, I think she was projecting because he couldn’t stand who I was either.  I remember her yelling at me that I was like my father once and going to myself, “I think he’d take that as an insult as well”.  I wasn’t like either one of them.  She was a math teacher, he was a driven oilfield consultant.  I was just a kid that wanted to read history.

Of course being a kid, I was never disciplined and yet it my mom’s incredible discipline that kept the family housed and fed.  I don’t know if I was much different than other kids but she spent most of our her life being disappointed in me.

When it finally started to get better, the tumor started to affect her.  Doctors blamed stress from her kids.  She did too.  She was angry and lashed out at me and I had no idea what was happening.  When we found out she had a tumor (on Mother’s Day), it was both horrible and allowed us to have some healing.   She managed to see Wendy and I get married and loved Wendy but within two months, she couldn’t talk anymore.  The next spring she had passed away. 

I think about her a lot.  Wendy’s family rejected her when she told them of her childhood abuse.  They don’t know our kids and I don’t think they would recognize Wendy if she passed them in a mall or on the street.  In the last conversation I had with my father, he made it clear how much he couldn’t stand me or Wendy.  I don’t even know if he knows Oliver exists.  It’s lonely having almost no family and as much as it was hard growing up, I knew Mom loved me.   It doesn’t seem like a lot but on a day like today when we know that all of the surviving parents can’t stand Wendy or myself, it is a lot.

My regret is that my mom never saw either her grandkids grow up.  I’m not a perfect parenting and to be honest, some of my parenting appears to be the work of a mad scientist but I think she would have been pleased in the kids of kids Mark and Oliver have become.   She was also scared that I would leave Wendy as my father had done to us.

I remember sitting there in the hospital telling her that I remembered every detail of the day she told me that my father had left and that I would never make anyone I cared about go through that again.  During the worst of Wendy’s depression I remember laying on the sofa thinking, “this isn’t as bad as that day was”.  It’s been almost 19 years and 15 Mother’s Days later and we are still holding on.  I wish she could have seen that part.

Heading back to Ogema

By the time this publishes, I will be driving a 2016 Ford Focus (not the one below, this one is white) south to Regina where I meeting up with adventurer and author Robin Esrock.  He is a Ford Canada brand ambassador.  After meeting up (and I assume getting coffee at the Starbucks), we are heading south to Ogema, Saskatchewan (a place where I explored last year with Ford), testing out some food, riding the Southern Prairie Railway, taking in a museum, and then heading back to Regina.

In Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan with a 2015 Ford Focus

Wendy and the boys are coming along for the trip.  Instead of heading south with us, they are going to explore Regina and in particular, Wascana Lake and the Saskatchewan Legislature.  I’ll post some photos from the trip to the blog tonight.  I assume they will as well.

If you don’t want to read my account of the day, check out Elan Morgan’s blog.  It’s always a good read.

There is a book signing with Robin Esrock in Regina at 7:00p.m.  at the Chapters.  If you come on out, I’ll be there.  I won’t sign your book but we could totally do a selfie or something over coffee. 

Learning to walk again

So I have been walking about 25 kms a week the last two weeks.  I have learned a couple of things.

  • My House of Marley headphones rub on my face making a “swoosh swoosh” sound as I walk as the cord rubs across my beard.  Annoying so I am using a different pair.  It’s not like they are so great they are worth putting up with that noise.
  • It is quicker to walk through Nutana and go across Broadway Bridge and then through downtown and then Caswell Hill to get home than any other route.
  • It feels like it should be quicker to go to the University and then across the CP Rail Bridge but I am wrong.

Speaking of the CP Rail Bridge, I learned something while walking that route home.  I can’t go down stairs.  I kind of fall down stairs which was really concerning to me.

To skip back, on December 22nd, I had been consumed by a dangerously high fever for two days.  I was incredibly sick but I also wanted a cold drink so I got out of bed, walked down the stairs and passed out from the top.  I woke up in great pain at the bottom of the stairs with a couple of broken ribs and I realized that despite being declared infection free, the infection was running up my legs.  So to recap, I was laying at the bottom of my stairs, broken ribs, knowing that I was incredibly sick and still didn’t have a cold drink.  Ever since then I have been nervous about going down the stairs.

Since I have started walking long distances, I have learned that neither leg is working like they used to work.  One leg destroyed by infection.  The other leg destroyed by a large hole I accidently burnt in my ankle.  Great job.  Not only that but as I am walking they both respond differently from day to day which seems normal as they are getting into shape.

Yet going down stairs seems to be some sort of mystery and to be honest, it has been terrifying to me.  When I go down the stairs at the CP Rail Bridge at the weir, my heart rate goes up and it I find myself gripping the hand rail going down and instead of going down one step at a time, it’s kind of a controlled fall.

So on Sunday, Wendy and I went down for a walk along River Landing.  Part of it was me figuring out how to go down stairs again.

After shooting this, I found myself heading up and down the stairs.  As much as it freaked me out I made some progress.  Who would have thought when this started that two years later I would figuring out how to walk again.  Yesterday it actually felt like I had two legs again rather than just two things that hurt a lot but didn’t work well together.

The only other problem is that I have is stopping quickly.  It’s like my legs have bad brakes on them.  I am not sure why this is but it’s the next thing to figure out.   Years ago they did some tests on my reflexes on my feet and basically they no longer talk to my brain.  I am assuming that their lack of communication is what is causing me problems.

Other than that, it’s slow progress and feels pretty good.

Episode 004: Where would you place a downtown arena?

I saw Charlie Clark’s email newsletter this week and read his thoughts on the new arena debate.  I didn’t really buy his arguments or rather lack of argument but it started me thinking on where you would put a downtown arena if we wanted to build it.  I grabbed a camera and a tripod and went for a walk. 

I set up the tripod for the last shot and it worked a lot better.  I wish I had for the other ones but I was stopped a couple of times by both police and a City of Saskatoon employee.  All of them were super cool about it, they recognized me and wanted to see what I was up to but it was kind of through me off my game.  The next vlog will be better. 

What was the PM doing this week

Fundraising for the Conservatives

Fundraising note from the Conservatives…

Here are my feelings on travel pieces like this.  Both sides put them out and if they don’t journalists basically do the same thing.  They used to do these all of the time whenever Stephen Harper went to watch a hockey game and a piece would be written about the costs for the flight, security, and even what he paid for out of his own pocket.  It was like it was un-Canadian for a Prime Minister to watch a hockey game.

Now we see it done with the Liberals and it’s just as ridiculous.  It’s almost as if no Canadian Prime Minister should ever travel again for any purpose and it is the most Canadian mindset ever.  It is almost as if we should be ashamed that our Prime Minister travels and takes in meetings or is asked to events.

Take a hike

My leg has been messed up since November of 2014 and I have been told be stay off it.  I did my best and a couple of weeks ago it was healed up enough that I could start to walk on it.  Unfortunately I have been as active as a panda bear during the summer months (hilarious story about that, when the pandas were at the Calgary Zoo, we drove out as a family, stood in a long line, saw the panda just lay in a tree and do nothing.  It could have been a stuffed animal.)

So for all of the advantages of living in a neighborhood where you work is a great and all but my work place is 8 kilometers away from home.  So to make a long story short, Wendy has been driving me to work in the morning and I have been walking the 8 kilometers home.

So far it has been going well.  I got into a yelling match with a goose in Kinsmen Park but he was totally in the wrong.  Yesterday Wendy dropped Mark off at my work and then parked at 33rd Street bridge and then walked to Place Riel where we met up.  Oliver and Marley slowed the pace down considerably as we stopped at the ski jumps.

University of Saskatchewan Ski Jump

University of Saskatchewan Ski Jump

University of Saskatchewan Ski Jump

University of Saskatchewan Ski Jump

There is a beaver lodge at the bottom of the hill so Oliver, Mark, and Marley explored that while Wendy and I sauntered the other way.

On the way over, Marley encountered a train while crossing the CP Rail Bridge.  She was not happy about going across that again but she did and was okay.

So the good news is that it isn’t that bad of walk.  The bad news is that it is an incredibly boring walk, podcasts or not. 

The reality of politics

During the federal election, I remember watching long term Parliament Hill reporters in shock at some of the NDP and Conservative MPs who were losing.  They all said the same thing; they were hard working, not hyper partisan, and cared a lot about constituent issues. 

I was reminded of the same when Cam Broten lost tonight.  I have known Cam for five or six years and have seen him work extremely hard as an MLA on a lot of different issues.  Because of Wendy’s job and the neighborhood we live in, she has referred many people to talk to Cam and seek his help.  Most times they have reported to her that Cam’s office was able to help them sort out their problems; even if it wasn’t a provincial issue.  He was a great MLA.   I was always happy to see him and he has been in Wendy’s and my home.

For a bunch of reasons, it didn’t work out for him as the leader of the opposition.  Winning such a tight leadership race which was essentially the centric base of the NDP versus the left wing made it impossible to consolidate the party.  It also probably didn’t help that the “socialist” Bernie Sanders was making inroads in the Democratic primary and the left wing Rachel Notley is Premier of Alberta (even if she won because of a right wing civil war).  There was this feeling amongst many is that Broten was too centrist for the NDP, even if that is the kind of leader that Roy Romanow and Lorne Calvert were.  I don’t think the comments from Ryan Meili were overly helpful.  Neither was him not getting involved to help move the party forward.  It hurt Broten, it hurt the NDP.

Also, Brad Wall is incredibly popular.  How do you attack an incredibly popular Premier without upsetting people.  I keep hearing people he should have gone negative even more but that’s hard when people won’t believe it; remember, you have to believe in it for negative ads to work.  Also without the NDP having any rural strength, how do you actually act like a government in waiting.  This election was going to be bad regardless.  I said the upside was 20, the low was 5.  I predicted 14.  They got 10.

In the last week I could feel the vote collapsing for the NDP.  You could feel voters making the move to the Saskatchewan Party.  I don’t know why it happened but once it happens, it’s almost impossible to stop.   If Cam wasn’t the leader of the opposition, he would have survived with his seat but he was and Saskatchewan loses a hard working public servant.  That’s the reality of politics.

Tonight, the NDP need to do some soul searching.  Their party doesn’t exist outside of the inner city Saskatoon, Regina, and part of Prince Albert and now they have the same problem they came into this election with, a new leader, a caucus that didn’t run under the new leader, and nothing close to a rural breakthrough in sight.    It is a party that is a centre left party in a province that has swung to the right.  So whoever it is that is the new leader, have fun because one thing that we have learned is that being the leader of the Saskatchewan NDP could be the most thankless job in Saskatchewan.

Chicago — nicknamed ‘Chiraq’ — sees murder rate rises 80 per cent as gun crime reaches crisis level

Something is horribly wrong in Chicago

There is no doubt Chicago is facing a gun crisis. In the first three months of this year murders are up more than 80 per cent compared with the same period in 2015. A total of 135 people have been shot dead, more than in New York and Los Angeles combined.

At least 727 people have suffered gunshot wounds in the most violent start to a year in two decades. Guns are changing hands for less than US$50. Most of the shootings take place in parts of the city’s South and West Sides, where gangs have splintered into small factions fighting over a few blocks.

Increasingly, death is preceded by social media taunts in what has become known as “cyberbanging.” 

Professor Arthur Lurigio, a criminal justice expert at Loyola University Chicago said: “You have to be hyper-masculine, so if you get insulted on Facebook the only face-saving thing is to go shoot someone. The problem is they can’t shoot, they’ve never been to a practice range, so innocent children are getting hit.”

One of those innocent children was Zarriel Trotter, 13, who had recently appeared in an award-winning Internet campaign against guns. In the film Zarriel says: “I don’t want to live around my community where I’ve got to keep on hearing people getting shot.”

Last week Zarriel was himself shot in the back as he walked home from basketball practice and was left in a critical condition in hospital. According to witnesses, he was passing by as two groups of young boys opened fire following an argument over a girl.

Other incidents also stand out. One was the assassination of Tyshawn Lee, nine. He was murdered in an alleyway, allegedly by gang rivals of his father.

Actually the problem is that they are shooting each other after being insulted on Facebook.

The 501® Jean: Stories of an Original

Levi’s made a short documentary film about the history and cultural impact of the brand’s signature 501 jeans.

We trace the 501 Jean’s roots as a utilitarian garment for coal miners, cowboys, industrial workers, all the way to the creative workers who continue to wear it today.

Also: Just to troll the NDP, there is a lean consultant in the video.

A quick update from Earth

In the past two weeks, the results of three surveys and studies about the Earth’s climate have been released: a paper on a possible dramatic climate shift, a survey of coral bleaching at the Great Barrier Reef, and a study on the West Antarctic ice sheet. All three investigations tell the story of climate change happening quicker than was previously anticipated.  In short the earth isn’t doing well.

From the paper published last week by former NASA climate scientist James Hansen:

The nations of the world agreed years ago to try to limit global warming to a level they hoped would prove somewhat tolerable. But leading climate scientists warned on Tuesday that permitting a warming of that magnitude would actually be quite dangerous.

The likely consequences would include killer storms stronger than any in modern times, the disintegration of large parts of the polar ice sheets and a rise of the sea sufficient to begin drowning the world’s coastal cities before the end of this century, the scientists declared.

“We’re in danger of handing young people a situation that’s out of their control,” said James E. Hansen, the retired NASA climate scientist who led the new research. The findings were released Tuesday morning by a European science journal, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

A draft version of the paper was released last year, and it provoked a roiling debate among climate scientists. The main conclusions have not changed, and that debate seems likely to be replayed in the coming weeks.

The basic claim of the paper is that by burning fossil fuels at a prodigious pace and pouring heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere, humanity is about to provoke an abrupt climate shift.

Specifically, the authors believe that fresh water pouring into the oceans from melting land ice will set off a feedback loop that will cause parts of the great ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica to disintegrate rapidly.

The paper, written by Dr. Hansen and 18 other authors, dwells on the last time Earth warmed naturally, about 120,000 years ago, when the temperature reached a level estimated to have been only slightly higher than today. Large chunks of the polar ice disintegrated then, and scientists have established that the sea level rose 20 to 30 feet.

Climate scientists agree that humanity is about to cause an equal or greater rise in sea level, but they have tended to assume that such a large increase would take centuries, at least. The new paper argues that it could happen far more rapidly, with the worst case being several feet of sea-level rise over the next 50 years, followed by increases so precipitous that they would force humanity to beat a hasty retreat from the coasts.

In Australia, more than 40% of the Great Barrier Reef has been damaged by coral bleaching.

Scientists who have dedicated their careers to studying the reef and its ecosystem say the current bleaching is unprecedented, and perhaps unrecoverable. The emotion in their responses so far have been palpable.

“I witnessed a sight underwater that no marine biologist, and no person with a love and appreciation for the natural world for that matter, wants to see,” said Australian coral scientist Jodie Rummer in a statement, after spending more than a month at a monitoring station in the Great Barrier Reef.

Though corals comprise only about 0.2 percent of the global oceans, they support perhaps a quarter of all marine species. There’s about 400 years of coral growth rings in the Great Barrier Reef, though no evidence of widespread bleaching before 1998. The current bleaching is the third major episode since then, and the worst yet—driven by the record-setting El Niño and steadily increasing ocean temperatures triggered by human-caused climate change.

“What we’re seeing now is unequivocally to do with climate change,” Justin Marshall, a reef scientist from the University of Queensland, told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Nick Heath, a representative of the World Wildlife Fund in Brisbane, Australia, lamented that “we have been so complacent on this issue for so long” in an interview with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. He added that he hopes the current mass bleaching would “trigger us out of our complacency.”

“This will change the Great Barrier Reef forever,” Terry Hughes, the Australian coral scientist who has been conducting the aerial survey, told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Hughes said the bleaching was his “worst nightmare” and expects about half the affected coral to die in the coming months. “This has been the saddest research trip of my life,” he said in a statement. More than sadness, though, Hughes said he feels anger at the Australian government, who he thinks should have acted sooner to prevent the current situation.

And just yesterday, a study on the West Antarctic ice sheet was released that says the ice sheet could melt much faster than previously thought, raising global sea levels by 3 feet in less than 90 years. Even the normally staid NY Times is getting really nervous.

For half a century, climate scientists have seen the West Antarctic ice sheet, a remnant of the last ice age, as a sword of Damocles hanging over human civilization.

The great ice sheet, larger than Mexico, is thought to be potentially vulnerable to disintegration from a relatively small amount of global warming, and capable of raising the sea level by 12 feet or more should it break up. But researchers long assumed the worst effects would take hundreds — if not thousands — of years to occur.

Now, new research suggests the disaster scenario could play out much sooner.

Continued high emissions of heat-trapping gases could launch a disintegration of the ice sheet within decades, according to a studypublished Wednesday, heaving enough water into the ocean to raise the sea level as much as three feet by the end of this century.

With ice melting in other regions, too, the total rise of the sea could reach five or six feet by 2100, the researchers found. That is roughly twice the increase reported as a plausible worst-case scenario by a United Nations panel just three years ago, and so high it would likely provoke a profound crisis within the lifetimes of children being born today.

Of course there has been a bunch of stories lately that Miami might not make it to the end of the century.

In major East Coast cities, where land is sinking at the same time that seas are rising, an independent analysis by Climate Central shows that the rapid Antarctic melting described by the new modeling effort would push tide levels up by between five and six feet this century alone.

Climate Central’s analysis combined mid-range values from the new projections for Antarctic melting with previous mid-range projections regarding global sea level rise, along with local factors such as sinking that naturally occurs in some areas. It illuminated the dangerous collective impacts of the different ways that climate change is expected to affect sea levels.

If climate pollution is quickly and dramatically reined in, the analysis shows sea level rise in major East Coast cities, including New York, Boston and Baltimore, could be kept to less than two feet — which could nonetheless see developed stretches of shorelines regularly or permanently flooded.

Problems associated with sea level rise are expected to be worse in Louisiana, where stretches of land are being lost to erosion caused by flood control projects and gas and oil exploration. New Orleans could see more than seven feet of sea level rise by 2100, Climate Central’s analysis of the new findings showed.

West Coast cities would experience four to five feet of sea level rise by 2100, Climate Central found.

Oh and BTW, the maximum extent of sea ice in the Arctic was a record low in 2016, February was an outlier in terms of how unusually hot it was, March, while not as warm, will still be the hottest March ever, and just look at the 2016 trend in the first chart here.

The reality is that most of the world’s leaders are still making half assed attempts of change or in the case of our Premier, wants all climate change proposals to pass an economic test.  Miami is going to disappear, there is a drought so bad in California that the land is actually sinking and Saskatchewan has no climate plan other than a carbon capture program whose main goal is to enable fracking. 

When do we realize we are all in this together and that is going to sacrifices on all of our part.  Technology isn’t going to save us.  Innovation isn’t going to save us.  It’s going to be all of us changing the way we live.  What are the chances of that happening?  Sadly about zero.

Some thoughts on the Saskatchewan Election

Murray Mandryk hits on the NDP campaign here.  My thoughts on his thoughts are here. 

  1. Brad Wall ran the classic front runner incumbent campaign.  It was the same campaign the federal NDP ran last fall and the BC NDP ran in British Columbia.  The difference was that he was the front runner and the incumbent.
  2. I thought the Saskatchewan Party platform was visionless and not worth a second mandate but the NDP didn’t do anything to discredit it or point out that with the economy struggling, some of it’s major planks were not going to happen.  When your major plank is helping people sell more puffed wheat cake and fixing more highways and that is really it, it’s a visionless campaign.
  3. With both parties running candidates with DWIs, neither campaign had any moral high ground.  It’s the first campaign with what is written on Facebook was considered worse than driving while impaired.  Saskatchewan values?
  4. Plus, we all know the next budget will have the Saskatchewan Party saying a) we don’t have a spending problem, we have a revenue problem and b) massive cuts to education, health, social services.  It’s going to be bad for all of us.  I am not saying that it is the wrong path but they do have a revenue and a spending problem and the spending is going to have to stop.
  5. How poor are the candidates for the NDP that it never occurred to them do delete their Facebook accounts when they decided to run or the nomination.  Also, the lack of simple vetting was ridiculous and speaks poorly about Frank Quennel’s leadership of the NDP.  It was a fixed election date, not a snap election.  That cut the knees out from Cam Broten in the first week of the campaign.  They never recovered. 
  6. I really don’t care what NDP candidates in rural Saskatchewan say to me during the campaign about the leader but it does speak to the lack of discipline they have and the state of the party in rural Saskatchewan.  This goes back to the Romanow years and isn’t getting better.  The NDP are very unpopular in rural ridings and nothing we saw in this campaign will change that.   For years the Saskatchewan Party was looking for an urban break through.  Remember Elwin Hermanson’s last campaign?  He lived in Saskatoon and Regina and didn’t see the promised breakthrough.    My point is that I think the NDP have massive problems in rural Saskatchewan an it is going to take them at least one more election before that changes.
  7. For those of you out there who are going to write off the NDP after this election, may I show you about a hundred articles saying the same thing after Stephane Dion and then Michael Ignatieff lost.  Also the Liberals were in third place going into this last provincial election.  Same thing for Mike Harris and the Progressive Conservatives when he won in Ontario the first time. 
  8. Speaking of the Liberals, I think it was a huge mistake for Darrin Lameroux to avoid Twitter and social media during the entire campaign.  It’s free media and it was the only medium the Liberals could use that would give them a provincial voice.  Instead he decided to meet people face to face.  Huge mistake.  It’s not an either/or, it’s a both/and.
  9. No campaign took advantage of one of the best political blogs out there and that was Tammy Robert’s musings.  I don’t know what Tammy’s stats are like but it was well read by many politicos and journalists in the province.  Howard Dean got huge play out of posting on Larry Lessig’s blog for a week.  Part of me thinks that it would have been advantageous for Darrin Lameroux or Cam Broten to do some guest posts and interact with commenters during the writ for a day.
  10. Personally I don’t think the NDP should turf Cam Broten.  Dalton McGuinty went through this. Rachel Notley went through this.  Stephen Harper went through this.  Tossing the leader won’t ail what is wrong for the NDP.   Plus a lot is going to change in four years.

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