It literally can’t get any worse

I don’t blog much about work but I thought you would like this.

My boss is a genuine long term New England Patriots fan.  His wife is a Pittsburgh Steelers fan who hates the Patriots.  I think that is awesome.   They are genuine fans.  I don’t know how their marriage survived some of those playoff games.

A sad Tom  BradySo being a Broncos fan, you know how classy and graceful I would have been when the Broncos beat the Tom Brady led Patriots twice and won the Super Bowl.  Well I may have posted a photo of Tom Brady sitting on the turf near tears on the bulletin board.  Just like that one to the left.  See I can’t even help myself now.  It wasn’t always classy.  As a true fan, he accepted the mockery that his team was beaten by a team with a noodle armed QB.

Then this came out.  The Broncos have the worst QB situation in the NFL.

The Broncos have the worst QB situation in the NFL.

That Sanchez may actually lose a training camp battle to Trevor Siemian tells you everything you need to know about his ability. The Broncos will not ask much from whomever they elect to start come Week 1: Just don’t turn the ball over too much and complete some simple play-action passes. But even that may be too much for Sanchez, who, even at an advanced age, is just a mess in the pocket, melting down at the first sign of pressure. And, unlike his predecessor Peyton Manning, Sanchez offers very little in the way of pre-snap adjustments.

When Denver signed him, friends phoned up and were like, “How are you and Mark handling this?”  It was like this was sports news that was sooooo bad, it actually provoked some people I know to think, “I should phone up Jordon to see how he is handling this.”

Then you read the rest of the reviews and it’s like Mark Sanchez stole the writers girlfriend while at USC, they are all pretty fair.  Sanchez is just that bad. 

Guess who is number 1?  Yeah, some dude from New England.

I read this and thought, “It’s going to be a long season at work.”  Note that I said it wasn’t going to be a long day or week but a long NFL season at work.

I was left with a ethical work related dilemma.  Do I show Glen this or just pretend it didn’t happen ignore the reality that Mark Sanchez is the Broncos QB.  Maybe he wouldn’t realize how bad Mark Sanchez was.  Yeah right.  That whole AFC East thing.

When I showed the article to Mark, who is also a Broncos fan, he goes, “Bad couple of months at work ahead.”

So I emailed my boss with the subject like, “I’ll just get this out there” and sent him the link.  He didn’t even read the entire list.  Seeing the Broncos at the bottom of the QB pile was enough joy for him.   If I was him, I would have just read it slowly and savored the list of horrible QBs that were listed as better than Mark Sanchez.

As Mark and I talked, we realized that there is only one way to get through this.  That is go online and purchase this life sized replica of the Vince Lombardi Trophy and carry it around work wherever I go.  If I am writing, I have it beside me.  If I am in a meeting, it’s there with me as well.  I even take it to the washroom or for lunch.  Then whenever I am mocked for whatever Sanchez has buttfumbled this week, I say, “I’m sorry, I am just admiring my teams Super Bowl 50 trophy” and move on to the next topic.

Replica Super Bowl 50 Trophy

Wendy wasn’t enthused at me spending almost $600 on this so it looks like a long season of mocking is ahead.  Mark Sanchez, it literally can’t get any worse.

Update: Here is some feedback from friends.

  • Dominant defenses generally slip the next season.  There is little chance that Mark Sanchez could become Trent Dilfer.  Partly because no one thinks that Sanchez is even as good as Trent Dilfer.
  • There is some hope that Paxton Lynch could become a great QB but this year?  It’s unlikely that he becomes the next Ben Roeslisberger and ride a dominant defense and running game to a 15-1 record.  Also, that ended with a loss to the Tom Brady lead Patriots.
  • My favorite comment was “even if you do buy the trophy, Sanchez would just fumble it”.
  • Some Detroit Lions fans out there have told me that if they could win the Super Bowl, they would take Mark Sanchez and all of the mocking from Patriots fans in the world.  So context is everything. 
  • I actually hoped the Broncos were able to draft Sanchez out of USC back in the Josh McDaniels era.  Instead they drafted Tim Tebow.  At least Sanchez is still back in the league.  Well maybe that isn’t a good thing.

Now I will honor the Rules for being a Sports Fan.  If there is anything left sacred in the world of sports, it is these rules.  The main one is that I can’t complain for five years since the Broncos won a championship.  So no Mark Sanchez complaining from me.  None at all.

Why Evangelicals Love Donald Trump

Possibly the most depressing thing I have ever read about the state of the evangelical church in years.

Kevin Kruse, a historian at Princeton University, has a theory: This is an echo of an old alliance between white, evangelical Protestants and the corporate world. In his book One Nation Under God, published last year, Kruse argues that business titans joined forces with ministers and pastors following the Great Depression, pushing back against the New Deal with a kind of “Christian libertarianism.” Later, Dwight Eisenhower took their arguments—that freedom from government is a necessary part of freedom under God—and transformed them into messages about America: “In God We Trust” was adopted as the national motto and added to U.S. currency, and “under God” was tacked onto the pledge of allegiance. In turn, Kruse argues, Nixon used the newly minted image of America as a “Christian nation” to justify many of his policies.

Perhaps a strain of “Christian libertarianism” is coming back in American politics, showing up in a push to have government “run like a business” and a sense of anxiety about individual religious liberty being trampled by changing social mores. Kruse and I spoke about the possible connection between Trump’s rise and this old strain of pro-individualism among some conservative Christians.

Here is some of what Kruse said in an interview with The Atlantic

The first strand is an old one. You can look at the way in which Christians, Protestants, have seen personal success as a sign of God’s work.

The real political linkage is one that comes about through these corporate leaders in the 1930s, who are looking for someone to push back against the New Deal. When their own efforts fall flat, they go looking for ministers to make the case for them. They come together around a common set of values: They see the New Deal and the labor unions’ power as forces of “pagan statism.” Through that common enemy, they make an argument that Christianity and capitalism are one and the same.

In my book, I talk about James Fifield, who argues quite explicitly that both the systems are based on individual salvation. In his telling, a good Christian goes to heaven; a bad one goes to hell. A good capitalist makes profit, a bad one goes to the poorhouse. In both systems, individuals rise on their own merits.

If you go back and look at the main libertarian thinkers from the 1930s on, religion doesn’t play a large role in their lives. Even some, like Ayn Rand, are atheists.

Christian libertarianism is an effort by ministers like Fifield or Vereide or even Billy Graham to appropriate classic libertarian arguments, which didn’t at all have to do with religion, and put a religious veneer on them to make them palatable for Americans. They reprint Hayek and von Mises and people like that who never would have made an argument in religious terms; they send them off to ministers and religious leaders. Christian libertarianism is essentially an effort to appropriate a political ideology that either had nothing at all to do with religion or was antithetical to religion and instead use it toward a set of ends that had a religious gloss to it.

Next year

Well with all of my photos from Banff and Yoho National Park posted, I thought I would write what we are thinking of for next year.

The big difference is we are doing a short trip on July 1st long weekend to Yoho National Park to hike Lake O’Hara.  Lake O’Hara has very restricted access but is considered one of the best hiking areas in the world.   So the plan is to drive out and the camp in the rustic Lake O’Hara campground before hiking the trails for two days.

We will take a longer vacation later in the summer.  We will also take Marley along for this one.

Day 1: Drive to Banff, get out and hike up Tunnel Mountain.  Die a little on top.  Walk back down.  Get back into car and drive to Lake Louise campground.

Tunnel Mountain in Banff National Park

Basically we never did do this during this year’s vacation because my ankle was so swollen that it felt like it was going to snap.  I want to do this next year.   As for the campground, I loved the Johnston Canyon Campground but Lake Louise Campground is closer to Yoho National Park and there are no reservable spots in Yoho.

Day 2: Hike to Lake Agnes Tea House.  Hike up the Little Beehive and the Big  Beehive.

Another idea from this year that was derailed because of my ankle.  If all goes well, three mountain tops and one cup of tea in two days.  I am more excited about the mountain tops than I am the tea to be honest.

Day 3: Yoho: HIke to the the Twin Falls

Get up early and drive into Yoho and hike from Takakkaw Falls past the Angel’s Staircase to the Twin Falls.  Then back.

Day 4: Walk the Past Trail

It’s not a long trail but I have always wanted to hike the Walk the Past Trail in Yoho.  It is near the Spiral Tunnels and it is littered with the carnage of runaway trains and exploding boilers that plagued the Big Hill during it’s existence.  This history geek in me is looking forward to this.  Since it won’t take long, I plan to check out Emerald Lake in Yoho as well.

Day 5: Columbia Ice Fields

I haven’t spent anytime in Jasper National Park so this will be fun but we are planning to take the Columbia Ice Fields tour as we relocate camp from Lake Louise to the Columbia Ice Fields Campground.

Day 6: Hike to Wilcox Pass

One of the best hikes in Canada, this high alpine pass should be fun.

Day 7: Athabasca Falls and Exploring the town of Jasper.

Day 8: Mount Edith Cavell trail

Edith Cavall Trail in Jasper National Park

Day 9: Edmonton and then home.

A lot is going on here

Jordon Cooper

First of all, thanks to Mark for the photo.  I generally hate photos of me being taken which is why I am always behind the camera but the problem with being a part of a family of photographers is that they have cameras as well.

Now you will notice the pockets in my shorts being wet.  It has just poured and was cold so I put my hands in my pockets.  This resulted in them looking like this.  You win some, you look like an idiot in others.  Thanks to Mark for capturing the essence of what it means to be a dad.

I am off to find my cool, from this photo it looks like I lost it.

Some Thoughts on Camping Gear

Some of you have asked how the gear we used on our trip worked.  Here are some thoughts.

  • Our Chevy HHR doesn’t have luggage racks so we bought a CCM rooftop bag from Canadian Tire.  The reviews were poor because they said it wasn’t water resistant at all.  So we tossed our sleeping bags and some tents into some heavy duty garbage bags.  We had extended periods of rain from Rosetown to almost Calgary.  When Mark and I opened the bag at the Johnston Canyon Campground, it was completely dry.  I am not sure what we did differently that those who had soaked bags but it worked great.
  • Nikwax Tent and Gear Solarspray: Provided waterproofing and UV protection to the tents.  While Mark and Oliver had a great high quality tent, Wendy and I were using a $100 tent from Walmart.  When it rained one night I was laying there going, “this should be leaking” and it never did.  So two thoughts from this:  Walmart tents are not bad for car camping and waterproofing your tent and tent fly is worth the money and energy.  Nikwax says that spraying UV protection on the tents will add years of life to your gear from backpacks to tents.

  • We bought a Walmart two burner camp stove instead of a Coleman stove because they were 1/2 the price, the reviews were excellent and I couldn’t tell any difference in build quality or design between the two.  It worked great.  We didn’t bring my Primus Classic Stove or Mark’s MSR Pocket Rocket but in hindsight, we should have just for making coffee and boiling water. 
  • If you have a Coleman Stove or need some propane canisters, the Real Canadian Wholesale Club has the cheapest canisters in Saskatoon.  They are around $4.   We bought three of them and thought we may need some more but we only used one and a bit.
  • A Red Niteize LED lightI bought Marley a red Niteize LED light for her collar.  She is a black dog and at night, is invisible.  She doesn’t like her natural advantage compromised but I can see her.  Other campers got a kick out of her as well.  We weren’t planning to do any night hiking but I put one on Oliver and Mark’s backpacks.  If we got caught out after dark, I want to see him.  Either way every night when Mark would take Marley for a walk though the campground, you could see this blinking from all over the place.
  • I had bought Wendy a couple of travel tea presses over the years and she offered to use one for coffee.  Big mistake.  I might as well just chewed on grounds.  The end result was not a single coffee.  We bought a GSI Outdoors Coffee Press last week.  Wendy can drink tea and hot chocolate, I want some black coffee. GSI Outdoors Coffee Press
  • We have some nice lightweight sleeping bags but while the air was hot, the ground was cold in Banff.  It got colder at night which meant with the air mattresses, we froze.  Wendy who has never camped before, ever realized that you needed some blankets between you and the air mattress to keep warm.  After Oliver was sick one night and we gave him one of our blankets, we froze.  We upgraded our sleeping bags this week to some four pound sleeping bags.  I had no idea you could sleeping bags for tall people but you can.  Mark and I both got tall four pound bags and since Wendy is confident that she will not hit a growth spurt at 46, she got a regular sized bag.  Oliver already had one.
  • Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Wendy loves her Olympus OM-D E-M10 II camera but with smaller mirrorless cameras, you have smaller batteries.  Wendy brought an extra battery along but in reality she could have had four or five.  Meanwhile I had two in my Pentax K-3 DSLR and grip and had two extra batteries and never had to use them.   Yes mirrorless cameras are smaller but that size in part comes from a smaller battery.
  • The hammocks were wonderful.  I am glad I bought them.  There is something about a nap in a hammock after a long hike on a cool summer afternoon.  The main difference between mine and Wendy’s hammock is hers had hammock straps while I had to use some cordage to tie mine up.  For ten dollars they are worth it and are easier on trees.
  • I bought a heavy duty pot, tea kettle, and frying pan for the gear.  Looking back, we may just go with our camp kitchen setup for next year.  They took up a lot of space although a decent frying pan seems worth it.
  • No one packed my camping chair but the Compact Lite chairs I bought for Wendy, Mark and Oliver worked out great.  They take up almost no room.  The ones I bought for them are too heavy for hiking but the Helinox Chair One looks great.
  • Get yourself a great camp light.  Wendy bought me a 300 lumen light from Walmart for Christmas.  It lit up our tent brilliantly and was so useful when looking for something in the car or the campsite at night.

Ventura 300 Lumen Lantern

Takakkaw Falls in Yoho National Park

This is why we came to Yoho National Park.   “Takakkaw”, loosely translated from Cree, means something like “it is magnificent”. The falls are fed by the Daly Glacier, which is part of the Waputik Icefield.   Its highest point is 302 metres from its base.  The falls drop a total of 992 feet in four distinct steps, first dropping over two narrow plunges hidden within the slot canyon at the top of the falls (neither of which can be seen from the base of the falls). The river then hurtles 853 feet over the side of the Yoho Valley wall, then cascading down a narrow flume-like stairstep for an additional 94 feet.

Yoho is where the big mountains are.  The drive to Takakkaw Falls both terrified and inspired the family.  It was worth the trip before we even got there.  I have never visited the park before and I can’t wait to return next summer.

Takkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National Park

Some of Parks Canada famed red chairs.Takkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkIMGP3191Takkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkIMGP3212Takkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National Park

The appropriately named Cathedral Mountain.Takkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkIMGP3228Takkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkIMGP3232Takkakaw Falls in Yoho National Park

The tradition of dunking one’s head in frozen water continues on.Takkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkIMGP3236Takkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkTakkakaw Falls in Yoho National ParkIMGP3251Takkakaw Falls in Yoho National Park

The Natural Bridge

While driving in Yoho National Park I saw a sign for The Natural Bridge.  I would have sworn under oath that it was in Kootenay National Park but I have happy to be wrong and so we went and checked it out.

It was pretty cool and as we were leaving, a family asked if they could have a family selfie with Marley.  Again, who takes selfies with strange dogs in strange countries as part of their Canadian Rocky experience?  Apparently quite a few people do. 

The Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National Park

Wendy pointed out that it does look like a giant toilet bowl being flushed.  The Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National ParkThe Natural Bridge in Yoho National Park

Spiral Tunnels in Yoho National Park

So after a fun morning in Moraine Lake, we went to Laggan’s Mountain Bakery and Delicatessen for lunch.  That place is amazing and if you are ever driving by Lake Louise, make sure you stop there for something.

Instead of turning back towards the Johnston Canyon Campground or Banff, I went west towards British Columbia and we spent the rest of the day in Yoho National Park where the plan was to see Takakkaw Falls.  Soon after heading across the border into B.C. and the park, I saw the sign for the Spiral Tunnels.  The inner nerd in me forced me to turn out as we checked them out.

Spiral Tunnels near Field B.C. in Yoho National ParkSpiral Tunnels near Field B.C. in Yoho National ParkSpiral Tunnels near Field B.C. in Yoho National ParkSpiral Tunnels near Field B.C. in Yoho National Park

Quick nerd break to explain why this was so cool. 

To complete the Pacific railway as quickly as possible, a decision was made to delay blasting a lengthy 1,400 feet (430 m) tunnel through Mount Stephen and instead build a temporary 8-mile (13 km) line over it. Instead of the desired 2.2% grade (116 feet to the mile) a steep 4.5% (some sources say 4.4%) grade was built in 1884. This was one of the steepest railway lines anywhere. It descended from Wapta Lake to the base of Mount Stephen, along the Kicking Horse River to a point just west of Field, then rose again to meet the original route.

Three safety switches were built to protect against runaway trains. These switches led to short spurs with a sharp reverse upgrade and they were kept in the uphill position until the operator was satisfied that the train descending the grade towards him was not out of control. Speed was restricted to eight miles per hour (13 km/h) for passenger trains and six (10 km/h) for freight, and elaborate brake testing was required of trains prior to descending the hill. Nevertheless, disasters occurred with dismaying frequency.

Field was created solely to accommodate the CPR’s need for additional locomotives to be added to trains about to tackle the Big Hill. Here a stone roundhouse with turntable was built at what was first known simply as Third Siding. In December 1884 the CPR renamed it Field after C.W. Field, a Chicago businessman who, the company hoped, might invest in the region after he had visited on a special train they had provided for him.

At that time, standard steam locomotives were 4-4-0s, capable enough for the prairies and elsewhere, but of little use on the Big Hill. Baldwin Locomotive Works was called upon to build two 2-8-0s for use as Field Hill pusher engines in 1884. At the time they were the most powerful locomotives built. Two more followed in June 1886. The CPR began building its own 2-8-0s in August 1887, and over the years hundreds more were built or bought.

The Big Hill “temporary” line was to remain the main line for twenty-five years, until the famous Spiral Tunnels were opened on September 1, 1909.

The improvement project was started in 1906, under the supervision of John Edward Schwitzer, the senior engineer of CPR’s western lines. The first proposal had been to extend the length of the climb, and thus reduce the gradient, by bypassing the town of Field at a higher level, on the south side of the Kicking Horse river valley. This idea had quickly been abandoned because of the severe risk of avalanches and landslips on the valley side. Also under consideration was the extension of the route in a loop northwards, using both sides of the valley of the Yoho river to increase the distance, but again the valley sides were found to be prone to avalanches. It was the experience of severe disruption and delay caused by avalanches on other parts of the line (such as at the Rogers Pass station, which was destroyed by an avalanche in 1899) that persuaded Schwitzer that the expensive solution of digging spiral tunnels was the only practical way forward.

The route decided upon called for two tunnels driven in three-quarter circles into the valley walls. The higher tunnel, “number one,” was about one thousand yards in length and ran under Cathedral Mountain, to the south of the original track. When the new line emerged from this tunnel it had doubled back, running beneath itself and 50 feet (15 m) lower. It then descended the valley side in almost the opposite direction to its previous course before crossing the Kicking Horse River and entering Mount Ogden to the north. This lower tunnel, “number two,” was a few yards shorter than “number one” and the descent was again about fifty feet. From the exit of this tunnel the line continued down the valley in the original direction, towards Field. The constructions and extra track would effectively double the length of the climb and reduce the ruling gradient to 2.2%. The new distance between Field and Wapta Lake, where the track levels out, is 11.5 miles (18.5 km).

The contract was awarded to the Vancouver engineering firm of MacDonnell, Gzowski and Company and work started in 1907. The labor force amounted to about a thousand and the cost was about 1.5 million Canadian dollars.

Even after the opening of the spiral tunnels, Field Hill remained a significant challenge and it was necessary to retain the powerful locomotives at Field locomotive depot.

Even though the Spiral Tunnels eliminated the Big Hill, the mountains remained and so too did the Field Hill. The Ottertail revision of 1902 and the five-mile (26,518 feet or 8.083 kilometres) long double track Connaught Tunnel of 1916 were other improvements made to the original line in British Columbia. It was not until the late 20th century when a major new project of 20 miles (32 km) including the 9.1-mile (14.6 km) Mount Macdonald Tunnel reduced the grade to a very manageable average of 0.82%, (maximum 1%) opened in December 1988.

There is a hike along there that we did not take but I intend to next year that should be a lot of fun.

Moraine Lake, Alberta

I should have posted these sooner.  When you take several thousand photos on a trip, you have to edit several thousand photos.  When I mean edit, I mean hit the delete key a lot.

In our last full day in Banff National Park, we planned to hike some of the trails around Moraine Lake.  Those plans were changed when almost all of the trails in the Valley of the Ten Peaks were closed because of grizzly bears.   That disappointed Wendy, Mark, and Oliver but I had a plan B, even if they didn’t know it yet.

As we drove up to Moraine Lake, the sign said the road was closed and three cars ahead of us did the U-turn and drove back down the road.  A Parks Canada employee walked up and waved us past the closed sign so upward we went.  It’s an amazing drive and show a forest that we had never seen before.

We finally got to the full parking lot and parked about a 300 metres down the road which was pretty good considering at times, that road has people parked on it for miles.

The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

After turning my back on Oliver for about a second, he thinks he is in the Logdrivers Waltz and is jumping from log to log to go up the rock pile.  Luckily the kid has skills and made it back to shore.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Canoes can be rented for about $60/hour or you can take a well maintained path to the stream/waterfall at the far side of the lake.  We decided to walk.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkIMGP3016

This is the end of the path but Wendy and Mark decided to test their luck and balance and keep going.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Marley decided to test her luck as well and wandered out into the water, fell in, got wet, hit her head and swallowed some water before getting out.  There was a Russian researcher there who had just gotten his permanent residency papers this week and was celebrating with his wife.  They loved Marley’s clumsiness and we had a great chat about the mountains, Trump, Putin, and dogs while waiting for Wendy and Mark to return.

The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkIMGP3063The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

I need to explain these photos.  Last year while at Sawback, I told the boys that there is a Cooper tradition of dunking you head into glacier waters the first time you head to a new lake or body of water.  There is no tradition, I just wanted to see if I could make them dunk their heads in the water.  This time Wendy and I were no so lucky as they made us dunk our heads in the freezing glacier water.Wendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkWendy dunking her head into Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Just before I did this, I think I said, “Mark hold my camera but no need to photograph this.”  He listens like his mother.

Solid hat don’t you think?

The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Did I mention I didn’t wear a hat in the Banff heat (and no shade) the day before.  I was burnt.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Me taking a photo of a person taking a photo.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

Don’t worry, it wasn’t a real bear.The views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National ParkThe views of Moraine Lake, Alberta in Banff National Park

While in the Gift Shop, I picked Wendy up a Moraine Lake t-shirt while Mark got her two bear figurines that made her day.  She was still on a high from seeing the black hear the day before.  It wasn’t quite as large as this one.

Vacationing with Mark

Several of you who are parents seem surprised that Mark enjoys going on family vacations still.  Many of you hated going with your parents at that age and some have kids who are resenting going on trips with them.

I don’t have a secret but here are some things I have done so Mark wants to go on vacation.

  • Scott Theede suggested we purchase Don’t Waste Your Time in the Canadian Rockies which is a book that evaluates hiking trails in the Rockies so you don’t take bad ones.   At first glance it seems expensive at almost $60 but it worth it when you consider it is 677 pages and if you are like us, refer to it often.   I have read the book cover to cover and so has Mark.  In fact he wants his own copy.   When we planned this trip (and are already planning the next one), I had Mark plan it as well.  I spent a lot of time getting his input and helping him figure out what he wanted to do and seeing how that can happen.  Mark suggested going to the Banff Upper Hot Springs and spent some time researching fun things to do.  He was also a part of decisions like, “Do we take the dog?”  It was Mark that convinced us that we should.  At the same time he also said, “I’ll help the dog on the Banff Gondola”, a decision that seemed a lot simpler in Saskatoon than it was in line at the base of Sulpher Mountain.

  • Mark and Oliver were comfortable in their own tent.  I kept hearing from people how much they hated sleeping in the tent/camper with their parents and how much of a different it made even as adults to have their own space.  Mark and Oliver have their own space.  They have their own duffel bags, sleeping bags, air mattresses, compact chairs, and gear.   They really appreciated having their own space.  It was worthwhile.   Parks Canada campgrounds only allow for two tents per campground (although I saw some that had a third small one) but I was clear to Mark that if he wanted his own space separate from Oliver, we would make that happen, even if it was a different campsite for him.  I’ll post the gear that we have for the boys in a later post.
  • I bought Mark the gear that he wanted.  In case it rained, he wanted a new deck of cards, a decent lantern for his tent and a great coffee mug.  The cost of all of those things was very low when you consider that they all made camping nicer.
  • I checked out the day’s itinerary with Mark every morning.  Now we have everything planned out a long time in advance but he appreciated the quiet conversation we had about what we were going to do and what ideas he had to make it better.
  • Despite being in the mountains before, this was the first trip he ever took where he was in awe with what he saw.  He fell in love with Castle Mountain and wanted to hang out and linger longer at the lookout.  He wanted to risk life and hypothermia by climbing up a stream and waterfall at Moraine Lake.  I just let him soak it in at his pace.  Same with Oliver.  Oliver’s camera is waterproof and at a certain time he sat on a rock taking underwater photos and was having a blast.
  • He had his own money from work but appreciated shopping with Wendy and I as he figured out what he wanted to get.  95% of that time was mocking what we saw but I know he did appreciate the suggestions on what to get.  My only disappointment was that he never got a onesie.

For next year we have started out debate about what we are going to do (the big picture is using Lake Louise Campground as a base camp to explore Lake Louise trails and some trails in Yoho National Park before pushing towards Jasper).  We are working on a budget and making a list of what gear to upgrade before next year.  He is a part of all of those discussions because I want it to be something we all like, not just Wendy and I.

Mount Norquay

After a day in Banff, I took everyone for a drive up Mount Norquay because Wendy and Mark wanted to see and sit in a Parks Canada Red Chair and I knew two would be up there.  At that point, I didn’t realize the upper Moraine Lake trails were closed because of grizzly bears and I hadn’t thought of going to into Yoho to see Takakkaw Falls yet (nor did I think they would have some red chairs.)

On the way to the chair, I got a phone call asking for Wendy.  She just got the word her father had died.  While she processed that news, a sports car pulls up and a guy and girl pop out because they want to pet Marley.  It was so weird and random but it happened that entire day.

Wendy soon joined us and as a family we walked down to this meadow and took in the views of Banff and the Bow Valley.

I should also take some time to point out that earlier in the day on the way to Banff and Sulphur Mountain, Wendy had her own bear sighting.  We were driving down the Bow Valley Parkway and a black bear popped up over the guard rail.  We had seen another black  bear and we are pretty sure we saw The Boss, a giant grizzly bear beside the road but they were in the middle of a bear jam and out of principle, we didn’t stop.  Wendy just mocked people for being stupid.  So when we saw this bear and we were by ourselves, Wendy was so pumped up.  It was hilarious and she was on a high all day.

Mt Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkIMGP2878Mt Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkIMGP2881The view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National Park

I am not sure how it happened but it looks like Mark got a hold of my camera.The view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkIMGP2907The view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkIMGP2920

I was accused of giving Mark the finger here but I think the photographic evidence is solid, I was just pondering what a bad kid he is.The view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National Park

We met this guy (or gal, I really have no idea) on the way up.  Wendy took some photos and we kept going.  On the way down he (or she) was in the exact same spot.  It was probably pondering what a bad kid Mark was as well.The view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National ParkThe view from Mount Norquy near Banff in Banff National Park

Think Big

This video was just posted to YouTube by the Government of Saskatchewan.  The quote at 2:18 by Scott Saxberg of Crescent Point Energy.  Here is the extended quote from the directors cut.

“Saskatchewan is a different province in that they have a great regulatory regime and they are always continually optimizing it and they are trying to improve upon it and work with industry to grow that industry.”

That is not the role of the regulatory regime.  The role of a regulatory regime is to protect investors/citizens/environment from industry, not help grow it.  Also, the day after Hitachi makes massive cuts in Saskatoon, someone decided to post a video of it’s CEO talking about innovation in Saskatchewan?  Then the same Cameco CEO that doesn’t like to pay taxes here?  If I had paid for this video (as a taxpayer I guess I have), I want it scrubbed from the web and never shown to anyone again.

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