Category Archives: sports

Liability concerns prompt some cities to ban sledding

Saskatoon holds firm and allows kids to be kids

Tobogganing is coming under threat as cities across the U.S. and Canada move to restrict – and in some cases outright ban – the activity.

Saskatoon isn’t on the list of cities considering a sledding ban, but the beloved winter pastime remains a dangerous one, say officials.

“Every year we see a lot of these types of injuries,” said MD Ambulance spokesperson Troy Davies, who confirmed that paramedics were called to three sledding incidents this past weekend.

The three most common types of injuries stemming from sledding are typically concussions, dislocated knees and twisted ankles, said Davies.

“With the rate of speed that people can get nowadays it’s become fairly common for us to deal with these types of calls,” he said.

Councillor Mairin Loewen said a sledding ban is unlikely. “This isn’t something that I would entertain,” said Loewen. “There’s typically some risk associated with most winter activities, but this isn’t anything that I’ve heard about.”

Dubuque, Iowa, is set to ban toboggans in nearly all its 50 parks. Other cities, including Des Moines, Iowa; Montville, New Jersey;

Lincoln, Nebraska; and Columbia City, Indiana, are following suit by restricting certain runs or posting signs warning people away.

When I was 8, I was sledding in a private park in the Canyon Meadows neighbourhood in Calgary.  It was a long and steep hill which has a slight curve in it.  It was well lit at night by light standards that were on the top of the bowl.  I was sledding on one of the circular saucers which always made you go down backwards.  

As I was descending this steep and icy hill… backward, I rose up the side of the hill and hit one of the light standards hard and almost straight on with my spine.

I hit the light standard just off centre so I managed to take the full impact but still keep going up over the top of the bowl and back down the other side.

I remember laying on my back and kind of doing a medical version of the song, “Do the hokey, pokey”.

“Put your left foot in”

Okay, that is working

“Take your left foot out”

So that foot isn’t broken.

“Shake it all about”

Now that hurts a bit.

I was fine but had a bruise going from my one butt cheek to my shoulder.

After some adults confirmed that I was only slightly concussed, I was back on the slope.  Since my neighbourhood didn’t have a private park (or a toboggan hill) anything less than a collapsed lung and I would have fought to stay on that hill.

My point is that Councillor Mairin Loewen is completely right.  All of us knew there was considerable risk of putting small children on fast devices on a hard service with no safety devices.  We did it any ways and our parents encouraged it.

It is natures way of deciding who can live on the prairies and who has to move to the west coast.

The ticket prices are too damn high!

IIHF president Rene Fasel said Hockey Canada set ticket prices too high for preliminary world junior games, contributing to disappointing attendance figures

The IIHF said Hockey Canada was responsible for the ticket prices that may have led to empty seats at Montreal’s Bell Centre for preliminary games at the world junior hockey championship.

Face-value tickets for games in Montreal started at $71 and ranged to $336 for the New Year’s Eve game between Canada and the United States, which drew 18,295 fans. Just 14,142 fans were in attendance for Canada’s opening game against Slovakia on Boxing Day.

The capacity of Bell Centre is 21,273.

Tickets for Canada’s first three round-robin games (against Slovakia, Germany and Finland) ranged from $66 to $261.

“I was really surprised,” IIHF president René Fasel said at a news conference Sunday. “If you would do this pricing in Europe, you would have nobody in the arena.”

The average NHL ticket price is in the $65 range. Face-value single-game tickets for the Canadiens’ next home game Jan. 6 against the Tampa Bay Lightning range from $27 in the family zone to $275 in the platinum level.

The Canadiens play just above capacity and are second in the league in attendance with an average of 21,286 fans a game.

Fasel wondered if marketing and the economy in Montreal played a role in the world junior attendance problems. He conceded not personally knowing what the ticket value should be, but added, “Hockey Canada decides the prices of the tickets, not us.”

$261 to wach Slovakia and Finland play seems a little high for a round robin game.  In fact that was the best part of the tournament in Saskatoon was that you could afford (and get tickets) to a Slovakia and Switzerland game and not have to pay an arm and a leg (and be in a packed SaskTel Centre full of fans cheering for both teams).