Category Archives: Saskatchewan

Is Saskatoon making a dangerous mistake relying on Field Turf?

When I criticized Field Turf going into SMF Field, I was ridiculed when I pointed to research that showed that the heat and things like ACL and MCLs would be on the rise.  The argument was that it was better then the old Gordie Howe field was often mentioned.  It never occured to anyone that we could put down good turf like the Hilltops play on each and every day at Ron Atchison Field.  It also never occurred to people that maybe high schools don’t need to bus down to Howe Bowl all of the time and instead they could play on their home field like other cities do. 

Now there is this.  Field Turf is made from tires which are hazardous waste when they are tires but for some reason we have decided to let our children play on them in pellet form.

These are the days when the Women’s World Cup becomes truly grueling. Fewer days off, better opponents, more pressure. And a persistent obstacle the men never have to face – the artificial turf.

"I have plenty of blisters on my toes," United States forward Alex Morgan said with a resigned smile on Thursday.

That’s not a good thing for any player, let alone a star on the mend from knee and ankle ailments. "Turf achiness takes a little longer to recover from," Morgan said.

Michelle Heyman of Australia was even more blunt: "You wouldn’t want to see the bottom of our feet after a game," she told one Australian newspaper. "They just turn white. The skin is all ripped off; it’s pretty disgusting. It’s like walking on hot coals with your skin ripping and slowly cracking, constantly."

Well that isn’t the worst part.

Field temperatures in Edmonton for an earlier match soared as high as 120 degrees, even though the air temperature was in the low 70s. This weekend’s forecast for the Australians’ match with Japan is calling for a high around 90. One UNLV study found synthetic turf can heat up to 170 degrees in summer months. That poses risks ranging from dehydration to heat illness.

Then there is the possibility of faster collisions with other players, and with the ground. Jeffrey Kutcher, one of the world’s leading sports neurologists, told Yahoo Sports that studies of turf vs. grass haven’t been conclusive in his field, but "I would still stand behind the concept that grass is likely safer from a concussion standpoint."

No wait, that isn’t even the worst part.  This is the worst part.

Artificial turf is used for playgrounds all over the continent, and battles are taking place over whether children are safe being exposed to the crushed tire rubber that makes up the turf. A Stockholm University study from 2012 found "automobile tires may be a potential source of highly carcinogenic dibenzopyrenes to the environment."

"It’s a serious, serious problem," says Nancy Alderman, president of the Environment and Human Health, Inc. (EHHI), an organization of physicians and public health professionals. "We are concerned about the health of a whole generation now who are playing on these fields."

Research on the topic is not advanced enough to conclusively determine safety hazards, but anecdotal evidence has hit close to home for the U.S. team. Amy Griffin, assistant coach at the University of Washington and former mentor to Hope Solo, has compiled a list of 153 student-athletes, the majority of them soccer goalkeepers, who have been diagnosed with cancer over the last several years. She has sent her research to the Washington State Department of Health.

"I never said this is giving people cancer," Griffin said by phone. "But if you were me, and you saw the number of goalkeepers [with cancer] was so high, you’d be alarmed.

"The more I know about tires, the more I think, ‘What the heck? What are we doing?’ " Griffin said. "In large form it’s hazardous waste, and in crumb form it’s OK for kids?"

The EHHI has been studying this issue at Yale University, and it released a statement earlier this month revealing it has found 96 chemicals in the materials used for synthetic turf.

"Of the 96 chemicals detected," the statement read, "a little under a half have had no toxicity assessments done on them for their health effects. … Of the half that have had toxicity assessments, 20 percent are probable carcinogens."

The lead investigator on the study, Yale University professor Gabdoury Benoit, called the rubber infill "a witch’s brew of toxic substances. It seems irresponsible to market a hazardous waste as a consumer product."

FieldTurf, the company that provided the playing surface for three of the World Cup stadiums in Canada, wrote in an email to Yahoo Sports stating that "Scientific research from academic, federal and state government organizations has unequivocally failed to find any link between synthetic turf and cancer. We are committed as a company and as an industry to the safety of our fields and the athletes that compete on them – which is why we have encouraged the rigorous work from third-parties that has taken place over decades to confirm there are no negative health effects connected to synthetic turf." The company also forwarded an array of documents supporting its case.

The lack of proof of causality is not soothing to some experts, however. "Cancer is a 30- or 40-year process," Yale oncologist Barry Boyd said. "So long-term exposure may not show up until years later."

Part of the uncertainty is the extent of a player’s exposure to the crumb rubber. The preponderance of goalies in Griffin’s research is troubling, as those players are interacting more with the turf by repeatedly diving onto the ground. But American players here have said they have found the pellets all over their body even after post-match showers. "Anywhere and everywhere," defender Lori Chalupny said. If the pellets do have toxic characteristics – especially under extreme heat – the proximity of athletes to those characteristics is there after games.

So kids start playing Kinsmen Football on turf.  They play three years on it at the SaskTel Soccer Centre and SMF Field.  Then they play parts of four years of high school football.  The best play four years of Hilltops and then Huskies on artificial turf.

Of course the reason we use turf is that it is cheap.  No other reason.  The NFL has known for years that it shortens careers, particularly of running backs whose knees pay the cost.  Countless NCAA universities who have had artificial or field turf are going back to grass because of the injuries.  Even the Arizona Cardinals who play in a dome stadium move the entire field outside during the week so they can have natural grass.

Good grief, the Blue Jays are paying $600,000 a year to Guelph University for them to develop a grass that will grow inside. Why? It is so hard on athletes, even baseball players to play on turf.  Now it appears that the turf that Saskatoon just fundraised to install has a major health risk to the kids who are going to play on it.  Nice job Saskatoon.

Darren Hill: “We’ve screwed this up completely”

No, it’s not Darren Hill’s re-election slogan, about Cosmo, the North Bridge, or about rising crime in Mayfair.

A Spadina Crescent home where author Farley Mowat once lived will not receive heritage designation, which could have brought the owner up to $84,400 in tax abatements to cover ongoing renovations.

Although the city had given the homeowner the green light to start his renovations a year ago and appeared poised to grant his application for heritage designation this spring, the provincial board that oversees heritage properties recommended last month that the application be denied. Council on Monday voted to accept that recommendation.

“We screwed this up completely,” said Coun. Darren Hill, who was alone in voting against the province’s recommendation.

“There’s no doubt that this was a comedy of errors from the start of that application process.”

Mayor Don Atchison disagreed.

“If the province wasn’t prepared to go that direction at all, I don’t know why we’d be going there either,” he told his colleagues before the vote.

So let me get this straight.  The City of Saskatoon told a homeowner to go ahead with renovations (that I assume they approved) and now that the province disagrees, the city walks away and leaves the homeowner with a $84,000 hole in his budget and no one on council cares.

I know this house in in Hill’s ward but it seems a little cold, even from a council that doesn’t often care about individual homeowners.

Charlie Clark wants more civilian oversight of Saskatoon Police

It’s a worthwhile idea

Coun. Charlie Clark wants city council to explore the idea of adding two additional civilians to the city’s board of police commissioners.

“Police boards are set up with the intent of providing a buffer between politicians and police,” Clark said.

The board currently consists of two members of the public, two city councillors and the mayor. If Clark’s idea is adopted, the addition of two additional citizens would mean politicians would be outnumbered by members of the public.

Clark said the board is meant to act as a independent body — not simply a “creature” of city council.

He said having members of the public outnumber politicians on the board would bring another “layer of independence” to the commission.

A couple of years ago the police commission met for a total of five minutes in public before heading in-camera.  Any change to that would be welcome as well.

The Gift of Green Nature Trail in Pike Lake Provincial Park

For Oliver’s Birthday, we went and hiked the Gift of Green Nature Trail in Pike Lake Provincial Park.   The nature trail starts at the interpretive centre located beside the campground office.  The nature trail follows a 1.5 km loop and winds through an aspen woodland, a swamp, over shortgrass prairie and across sand dunes.

The Gift of Green Nature Trail in Pike Lake Provincial Park

The Gift of Green Nature Trail in Pike Lake Provincial Park

The Gift of Green Nature Trail in Pike Lake Provincial Park

The Gift of Green Nature Trail in Pike Lake Provincial Park

The Gift of Green Nature Trail in Pike Lake Provincial Park

The Gift of Green Nature Trail in Pike Lake Provincial Park

We walked in the late afternoon and it was a great trail to walk.  Pike Lake has gotten a lot nicer in the last several years and this is a great addition to the park.

TransformUS

So apparently TransformUS was a cost cutting measure designed to take money out of the university and place it in the hands of lawyers

Former University of Saskatchewan president Ilene Busch-Vishniac has filed a lawsuit in which she claims Premier Brad Wall, former advanced education minister Rob Norris and university board members all played roles in her termination last year.

In a statement of claim filed Wednesday at Saskatoon Court of Queen’s Bench, Busch-Vishniac’s lawyer alleges Wall and Norris unlawfully interfered with the decisions of the U of S board and that the board did not follow protocol when it called an emergency meeting last May during which members decided to fire her without cause.

Statements of claim contain allegations which have not been proven in court.

The claim further alleges that “Silence of the Deans,” a document criticizing the university’s controversial TransformUS cost-cutting plan that was publicly authored by ex-public health dean Robert Buckingham, was in fact orchestrated by former university president Peter MacKinnon and his wife, Janice MacKinnon, who is a professor at the university.

The claim says the couple instructed Buckingham on what to write, when to disseminate the document, and to whom he should send it.

When reached by phone Wednesday, both MacKinnons denied the allegations.

“I’m not a party to this lawsuit and I can simply say that the allegation that you refer to is not true,” Peter MacKinnon said.

“It is simply untrue, simply not factually accurate, untrue,” Janice MacKinnon said. “It’s before the courts and the documents will show that it’s simply untrue … it’s in the court, so I don’t really want to say more.”

Busch-Vishniac is seeking $8 million in damages, plus $250,000 for defamation and $250,000 for aggravated, punitive and exemplary damages.

The claim says the former president was “arbitrarily and unlawfully terminated from her position as president,” which has caused “irreparable damage” to her reputation.

Busch-Vishniac has made “extensive efforts” to find work similar to that of university president, but she has been unsuccessful, the claim states.

“She has become effectively unemployable as a senior executive in a university or other setting,” it reads.

Busch-Vishniac was fired by the U of S board of governors without cause on May 21, 2014, after a tumultuous week at the university.

I feel bad for Brad Wall, Rob Norris, the MacKinnons and the University of Saskatchewan.  It can’t be fun to have this brought up again after seemingly moving past a disaster a year ago.