Category Archives: photography

Sturdy Stone Centre

Sturdy Stone Centre in SaskatoonSturdy Stone Centre in SaskatoonSturdy Stone Centre in Saskatoon

It’s ugly no matter what angle you photograph it from. 

This 13 story building was built in the Brutalist style of architecture and opened in 1977. Floors 3 to 7 are used as a parkade, with the remainder of the building being office space. It was designed by the architecture firm of Forrester, Scott, Bowers, Cooper and Walls.

This was formerly the site of the Standard Trust Building, a seven-storey office building. It was built in 1912-1913 and demolished in 1976 to make way for the Sturdy Stone Centre. Public concern raised about the demolition of that building caused the Saskatoon Heritage Society to be formed.

Well this doesn’t look good.

So the other day I was messing around with my photo project Bridge City and everything went wrong with the database.  My WordPress database was messed up.  The backup was less messed up but it was a mess.  I felt like hurling.

For those of you know follow it, you know that I have uploaded about 750 high resolution photos of Saskatoon to the site, organized by neighborhood.  For the historical buildings in Saskatoon, I tracked down the architect and learned a lot about the city in the process.  There was David Webster the father and David Webster the son.  Many historical records claim David Webster as architect when he wasn’t and some historical records have contradictory information which often means the building construction is more complicated than we ever thought.  Personally I think at one point in our city’s history, if we didn’t know who the architect was, someone at the back at the room yelled out, “David Webster” and someone said, “sounds good” and that was it.

The project has been a lot of fun as I have spent many a day off buried in archives and online tracking down a list of questions that I can’t find an answer for.

Since the project is to document the important buildings in the city, it has gotten me off the couch and out in the streets, often with Mark and Wendy in tow as we try to capture the building.  This process has attracted building owners, neighbors, and even Saskatoon City Police officers to see what I am up to and then share some of what they know.  It’s been a lot of fun.

The good news is that the photos aren’t lost but the information and research is.  For a couple of days I was torn between recreating the site or just posting the photos here.

From a branding perspective, having my photography under my site and name makes the most sense but I really like being able to browse by neighborhood and creating a resource that is used by a lot of you.  For all intents and purposes my Flickr account does the same thing but I enjoy going through it, researching what I have captured and filling out the site.

The plan is to upload and post 10 archival posts a night to Bridge City and of course one new one each day.  Hopefully the site will be back to where it was (and maybe even better) by late summer.   So if you are one of the people that checked it out and used it as a resource, thanks for reading, commenting, and correcting.  I love the input.

I get asked all of the time why I spend so much time documenting and capturing the city.  Basically as a writer, I find myself writing about what is messed up with the city.  I write about social justice and City Hall.  I deal with politicians who look me in the eye and lie to me.  That kills one’s enthusiasm for the city you live in.

Then I go out with my Pentax K-3 or a cheap point and shoot and I see the city in a different way.  The city slows down.  There is time for coffee and chatting.  I find myself falling in love with this city all over again.  In the end, carrying a camera and shooting some photos or video connects me to the city and it’s people.  That’s still kind of important to me.

Albert Community Centre

Albert Community Centre in Saskatoon

The Albert Community Centre was built in 1912.  It  is a designated Municipal Heritage Property located in the Varsity View. Originally built as the Albert School, the two-and-a-half story brick building served as a public school until 1978 when the building was sold to the city and became the Albert Community Centre.  It is one of the “castle schools” designed by local architect, David Webster.

Our Lady of Lourdes Parish

Our Lady of Lourdes Parish is a daughter of St. Joseph’s Church. On September 16, 1963, Our Lady of Lourdes Chapel and Auditorium officially opened and was blessed by Bishop Francis J. Klein. The architects were Webster, Forrester, & Scott and the contractor was Boychuk Construction Company.  Originally, Our Lady of Lourdes was under the direction of St. Joseph’s Parish and served by priests from St. Joseph’s Church. However, with the fast growing community, it became apparent that the Our Lady of Lourdes chapel population was big enough to become a parish.

Our Lady of Lourdes ParishOur Lady of Lourdes ParishOur Lady of Lourdes ParishOur Lady of Lourdes Parish

Our Lady of Lourdes received official parish designation on August 15, 1965. In September 1965, the Parish of Our Lady of Lourdes was officially formed. With this designation, Our Lady of Lourdes became a full parish under the Episcopal Corporation of Saskatoon and gained rights to perform marriages, christenings, and burials.

Gordon Oakes Red Bear Student Centre on the University of Saskatchewan campus

Gordon Oakes Red Bear Student Centre on the University of Saskatchewan campus

Gordon Oakes Red Bear Student Centre on the University of Saskatchewan campus

Gordon Oakes Red Bear Student Centre on the University of Saskatchewan campus

I have been walking by this building for the last couple of weeks but it is a pain to photograph in late afternoon.  The College of Medicine throws a long shadow and this was one of the few times I have been able to shoot the Gordon Oakes Red Bear Student Centre.  It home to the aboriginal student’s union on campus and was designed by Ottawa architect Douglas Cardinal.

Hiking the Spruce River Highlands Trail

Yesterday we got up early, grabbed our travel backpacks and headed north to Prince Albert National Park.  The line was long to get in but we by-passed it since we already had purchased our Parks Canada Discovery Pass on Mother’s Day.

We drove through Waskesiu and headed back down Highway 263 where we stopped at the trailhead for the Spruce River Highlands Trail.  It is a 8.5 km loop through a glacier shaped terrain.

About a kilometre in the trail there is a 10 meter tower that let’s you gaze over the forest. Many people only take this short trail, but I encourage you to explore the entire trail.

I expected it would take us three hours and in fact, it took four.  The trail is rated as moderate to strenuous and that’s about right.  It was a tough hike with few rewarding views.  You can get a nice view of Anglin Lake an it does drop down to the river bottom for about 100 meters but in the end, it was a tough slog.  Some of trails are either straight up or straight down which is why it so slow.  In other places the trail is at a sharp angle as it goes along the hillside.

The Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highland Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkRIMG3589The Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National ParkThe Spruce River Highlands Trail in Prince Albert National Park

The trail does have one challenging bog crossing.  I came out of it with muddy shoes and attacked by bugs but I considered that to be a lot of fun.  Also as Mark and I were crossing, Wendy and Oliver had walked ahead and had a really close encounter with an adolescent moose which made Oliver’s day.  The dog had the bear bell on her and there wasn’t any wind so the moose should have heard them coming.  Then again, it may have as according to Wendy and Oliver, seemed to check them out and then walk away.

We took the hike to see how my ankle responded (good) and how Oliver does on longer hikes (he did good as well) but this was a big test for Marley.  Last year as a puppy, every trail was a struggle with her and she was out of control with pulling and chasing every single noise.  This hike we put the dog backpack and bear bell on her (which we thought she would hate) and she was chilled out and relaxed for every single step, even when she came face to face with the moose.  She behaved better than I had ever hoped. 

With that figured out, I am a lot more confident in taking her to Grey Owl’s Cabin in June and Banff National Park in July.   The walk did wear her out.  She got out of the car, made it halfway across the living room to her bed, laid down and went back to sleep. 

Back to the trail.  We ran into several hikers going both ways and the hikers we ran into without walking poles all wished they had one.  It make a big difference crossing the bogs and walking along the trails on a steep pitch and angle.  Personally I didn’t need for them going up the trails but going down they were amazing, especially with my balance a work in progress.

I should have expected this for May Long weekend but there were no trail guides at the trail head and all of the markers had been removed, probably for maintenance.  I thought about grabbing my GPS but I had a compass and wasn’t worried about getting lost.  What I didn’t expect was that unlike several other Prince Albert National Park trails, there wasn’t a lot of landmarks that would make it easy to calculate distance back to the trailhead.  Without markers or a map, I had no real idea how much longer it was going to take which made it seem longer than it was.  It did for me.

That was kind of exasperated by the fact that we ran into some exhausted and uptight hikers on the trail who weren’t equipped with proper equipment or footwear and weren’t expecting the trail to be as difficult or as long.  So if you are thinking of taking the trail, bring a stand alone GPS (there is no cell coverage in that part of the park) for no other reason than just knowing how long the trail will be and where you are on it.

The only upgrades I would make the trail would be a couple of red chairs on the ride that overlooks Anglin Lake and then down by the river with some signage letting people how much longer.  Both would be amazing rest/reading spots.

Yashica Mat-124 G

I never shoot film.  I have taken probably 100,000 photos in my life and since I bought my first digital camera, I have never shot a film camera.  I had no desire to do so.   That being said, I have always wanted a Twin Lens Reflex camera.  My grandfather had one (probably a Kodak Dualflex) and I have always loved the look of Rolleiflex cameras.

The other day while working on something at Don’s Photo, a customer came in with a large collection of gear.  One of them was a Yashica Mat-124 G twin lens reflex camera.

Yashica Mat-124 G

It is a medium format camera (way bigger negatives than 35mm film) and not exactly the easiest to use but they are fascinating to me and I find them incredibly cool.   The gentleman wanted to sell it on consignment and after taking a look at it and the price, I decided to purchase, if only to own a piece of history.  Also, as Paul McCartney shows, it’s a great selfie camera (I’m kidding).

Paul McCartney taking a selfie

The first step was to load some film into it.  Which I’ll be honest, I had to ask a colleague on how to do.  it isn’t the easiest process to master.  After we did that, the camera is extremely easy to use and still meters.  It’s not a point and shoot but it is really easy to use. 

Since the Yashicamat camera is basically a Rolleiflex copy, the controls take a similar configuration. Build quality is very good and when the lens is stopped down, it takes excellent photos.

Now all I need to do is grow a beard, wear tight jeans, and some flannel, ride a fixie and I too can take part of the hipster revival on 20th Street.