JordonCooper Rotating Header Image

Twitter

Calgary/Banff 2012

It’s been so busy the last week and I have been so incredibly sick that I never posted this last week.  Since a bunch of you have asked how our mini-vacation went, here is the summary… just really late.

On Thursday morning we got up early, checked out the highway conditions and headed out to Calgary for the weekend.

It was Oliver’s first long road trip and we packed pretty well.  In his backpack he had his VTech tablet and some kid’s volume controlled headphones as well as a cheap set of binoculars.  Mark had his PSP and a National Geographic History magazine.  The end result is that we stopped in Kindersley (for a 5 Hour Energy Drink for me), Hanna (for windshield washer fluid), Drumheller (to take Oliver for a walk up the giant dinosaur) and the boys were remarkably good.

Drumheller's Dinosaur

The trip took up around 6 1/2 hours which is pretty good but like I said, our stops were quick.  The stop at Drumheller took the longest and Oliver wasn’t that thilled with the idea of running up the “butt of a dinosaur” and I carried him most of the 100 steps to it’s mouth.  

In the mouth of the dinosaur

After heading back down, we were off to Calgary and checked into our hotel at around 2:30 p.m. Calgary time. 

The hotel was the Best Western Plus Calgary Centre Inn and was quite nice.  Our room was massive and the photos on their site don’t do justice to how nice the pool area is.  They have a normal pool, a hot tub but also a small pool that is only 2 feet deep for kids.  Oliver loved, “his pool” and spent all of his time in it.  They also have a free continental breakfast that was varied enough that we didn’t get sick of it.  Of course it’s central location meant that it was out of the way of everywhere we wanted to go but not so far out of the way we didn’t go.

All day on Twitter, Mayor Nenshi was warning of the snowfall which we didn’t really notice until we hit Chestermere and the highway was closed because of a rollover.  I am not sure what happened as we didn’t find the highways that slippery.  There was some black ice but nothing that bad; then again I am used to driving in it.

We were two long blocks away from the 39th Street LRT station and took it downtown where we went for a long walk.  We had plans to head up the Calgary Tower but visibility was really poor so we just took in downtown Calgary.  The snow was really coming down but all over downtown were snow removal crews sweeping sidewalks and streets even as the snow fell which is quite a bit different than Saskatoon which puts the onus on store owners who may or may not shovel out downtown.  It’s almost as Calgary’s downtown is a place of commerce.

Stephen Avenue in Calgary

Snow clearing in Calgary

That night we headed back, checked out the pool and ordered in from Mother’s Pizza, something that I have done since I was old enough to know what pizza was.

Friday morning the roads in Calgary were reported to be in bad shape but in reality were quite good.  Thanks to Saskatoon for lowering my expectations for snow removal.  Mark spent the summer and fall saving up for a new iPod Nano and despite being $4 short that I kicked in for him, we went to the Apple Store in Chinook Centre where a clerk named Jazz managed to help him pick out the one he wanted.

Wendy and Oliver in the Apple Store

While Mark and Jazz finished the deal, Wendy pulled out her Samsung Galaxy and started to text something.  She was lucky she wasn’t tossed out.  As we were leaving, Wendy had a minor fit as she saw a Lego store and insisted that we had to purchase some Lego for Oliver for Christmas.  Long story short, Wendy always wanted Lego as a kid and never had any.  She had more fun than any of us in there.

As soon as we hit Highway #1, roads were perfect until we hit the Banff National Park gates and they never got the snow the rest of us got so it was a fun trip up with lots of stories and sight seeing along the way.  We went straight to Sulphur Mountain and took the gondola to the top of it.  Excited does not describe the reaction of Oliver and Mark who loved every second of the nine minute trip to the summit.  Once at the summit I was tempted to hike to the science station but it was blowing and cold up there so we ordered a bite to eat and chilled out at the top.

DSCF9052

Panorama from Sulphur Mountain

Once back down we did some shopping and Banff didn’t disappoint.  Every single shop had the exact same touristy junk.  As I told Wendy, I spent most of my life trying to buy something nice in Banff and failed.   Wendy found some earrings and found some Christmas gifts.  Mark managed to get some more money out of me and bought some magnetic rocks and a Gondola souvenir.  The highlight of the shopping was a large male elk meandering through main street and within inches of the car.

An Elk

I personally love Banff in the off season and hate it during the peak season.  The lack of tourists and crowds are nice, even if the weather is not.  What I loved about Banff is that there was absolutely no trace of snow along their main street.  Every flake was removed… again, it’s a place of commerce.

Finally we took the boys to Bow Falls where a combination of the cold, wind and humidity almost froze Wendy, Mark and I to death while taking some photos.  Oliver just said, “I want to wait in the car”

DSCF9081

Panorama of Bow Falls

As we were leaving, we went to Walsh’s Candy Store where I bought Mark and Oliver two massive jawbreakers and challenged them to finish them by the time we got to Calgary.  It’s an impossible task (knowing first hand) but neither one of them talked all the way back to Calgary.  I love it when a plan comes together.

For supper that night, we went to Five Guys Hamburgers for the first time.  We need one of those in Saskatoon in the worst possible way.  We ordered burgers and fries and couldn’t even start the fries as the burgers were so filling.

Saturday morning we met our good friend Dave King at Nellie’s where we had a good talk about politics, urban planning, cycling and photography all over a fantastic breakfast.  It was cold out that day so instead of going to the Calgary Zoo, we went back downtown and checked out Mountain Equipment Co-op (twice), the Calgary Tower, Glenbow Museum, and snagged some milkshakes at Peter’s Drive-Thru.

While at Mountain Equipment Co-Op, we did some Christmas shopping and Wendy agonized over which bag to purchase (which she always does).  She finally got one of these and seems at peace with the world.  Meanwhile I got a sleeve for the MacBook, a left handed sling pack, some gloves, bike lock (as well as one for Mark) and a lantern. Mark also bought a sling pack which means that we kind of match which is awkward.  At least his is right handed.

The Calgary Tower is always amazing and we spent a lot of time up there.  The glass floor was fun as people were absolutely terrified to walk out on it while kids seemed to not even notice.  Both Wendy and I took a bunch of photos with other people’s cameras while they stood out on the glass.  We went back downstairs and across the street to the Glenbow Museum where Mark really had a good time.  Wendy enjoyed the section on the National Energy Program and on Peter Lougheed.  It was weird to see a display honouring Preston Manning and not Joe Clark or Ralph Klein.  I know Manning has significance but so does Clark and Klein.

Oliver at the top of the Calgary Tower

The Bow as seen from the Calgary Tower

Saturday night against my better wishes, we went to Swiss Chalet.  Wendy and the boys had never gone but the meal was what you expect of Swiss Chalet.  Personally I am still bitter that St. Hubert is not in Calgary.  Sadly everyone in the family like the meal which means that I am going to have to fight not to go back.

Sunday we drove back home after some more running around.  The trip was quick as I had two boys chilling out to their iPods and sucking on jawbreakers.  The only excitement was when we were back in Saskatoon city limits when we found out again that snow removal baffles our fair city.

All of the photos from the trip can be found on either Wendy’s or my photo set.

Decorum in City Council

I mentioned earlier that Mayor Don Atchison and some other councillors don’t think that Twitter should be used in City Council.  Darren Hill is the only frequent Twitter user in Council and by frequent, I mean probably three tweets in a four meeting month.  In Hill’s defense, he says that he does it to correct false statements or misinformation.  A look back at some tweets he has sent out, not only is he right but often I am the one that is spreading false information… I got the name of the city administrator reading a report wrong and was quickly corrected.

This has had a weird impact on council in that Hill is one of the reasons why people care more about city politics than ever before (I’ll also give credit to Charlie Clark, Mairin Loewen, Sean Shaw and his blog, Dave Hutton and his live tweeting Council meetings) because we can interact with them.  What happened was that people (and our smartphones) started to show up at Saskatoon City Council meetings and we interact with each other and those at home, and even councillors in other cities who are following the action using the #yxecc hashtag.  At the FCM meetings, I was told by several city councillors from all over they love the actions on the #yxecc hashtag on Monday nights (often during their own council meetings) and want to know how to get that kind of civic involvement in their city.

Councillor do follow along.  I have been given the slow glare by more than one councillor after disagreeing with them as they check Twitter on their phone discreetly.  Is that kind of behaviour appropriate for an elected official?  Let me describe for you the kind of behaviour one sees at City Council. 

  • During the budget review process, at least two and probably three nodded off during the deliberations.  At least once a month, someone has taken a nap for a couple of moments.  If they weren’t technically asleep, they were pretty close.  I can tell when it is after 9:30 as one of the other councillors gets cranky after that hour.
  • Cosmo Industries showed a music video/song that they had made to guilt councillors into voting their way and instead of calling them out for it for a grotesquely manipulative act, they fell over telling Cosmo how great they were.
  • Councillors lecture each other, voters, and city administration for extended periods of time, often in the identical way that the previous speaker had just lectured someone and it keeps going on and on some meetings.  Everyone knows this is just political posturing and is contributing nothing to the debate.  Sometimes this is contrary to statements given at previous meetings or even earlier in the meeting.  It’s horrible.  Of course some of these talks are all about building up their perceived electoral base.  It has nothing to do with the current debate but one persons politics and it takes up a lot of time.  It is painful for me to listen to, I can’t imagine what it is like  for other councillors.
  • One councillor is consistently unprepared, hasn’t read the council package, and looks to others (generally the mayor) on how to vote.  That doesn’t stop that councillor from speaking for extended periods of time on topics the councillor doesn’t understand.  What frustrates me is that they are paid to be prepared.  I don’t get paid to attend those meetings and I read the council package.  Why can’t councillors?  Oh never mind, we know the answer.
  • The administration reports to council are often interesting but I see many of them before hand.  If I see them, I am assuming that most councillors do as well (that being said, not always) and have a copy of it in their council package.  While it’s always fun to hear from administration, how much attention does it take to hear the same report at least twice.  Oh yeah it’s also on PowerPoint so you can get to hear the administrator read you the report.

Not to go all John Turner on you and say that television has destroyed democracy but that is the main reason why the speeches can be so long and at times the behaviour can be brutal.  It is a partisan place, probably more so now that previously with quips and shots being taken.  I can’t see City Council meetings being a rewarding experience for anyone.

Before I go any further, some of the councillors are really earnest who really speak passionately on topics that may be unpopular.  After one meeting I asked a councillor if there was a plan behind alienating himself from an entire neighbourhood that was outside of his ward.  There wasn’t, he just thought they deserved an explanation for his vote.  I was actually inspired.  Other councillors pick their battles very carefully.  While some come unprepared, others know the package inside and out. (I have jokingly chided Mairin Loewen on Twitter [whose laptop screen faces where I often sit] for paying too close of attention.  That can’t be good for her).

In the end City Council is not a professional group of administrators or board members.  They are politicians and too many politicians are out to their own self-interests (mainly re-election).  If I was going to tackle any problem with council (other than the councillors who are just mailing in their votes and debate are replaced), I would:

  • Greatly limit PowerPoint and media (and no Keynote won’t make it better)  Limit media to drawings and maps.  The rest can be posted to the website.  No music videos.
  • It’s impossible to police but make it clear that political posturing speeches have be kept short.
  • Go to blind voting.  We have these big debates and you have a couple of councillors who are looking around at others on how to vote.  Really?  If you are going to vote together and you can’t even plan that out before hand, you deserve to lose more votes.
  • Come up with with some rules for technology.  Former NDP MLA Hon. Pat Atkinson used to tweet Question Period.  It was loved by both sides of the debate and it opened up the legislature in ways that we hadn’t seen before.  Technology is good and if council members can multi-task and if it doesn’t distract others, good for them.
  • Let coffee into council chambers.  The water looks really dignified but those meetings are two and three hours.  If it keeps council members awake, it’s a good step.  I also suggest cookies and snacks.  If a little bit of caffeine helps foster a more articulate debate, do it.
  • Stop with the partisan crap.  We have right wing candidates pooling their resources for a call centre (but we aren’t a slate) and coordinating some of their campaigns.  You have councillors advising candidates all in favour of more councillors of a particular worldview.  Is this really where we want to go?  What happened to the idea where wards elected candidates that are best suited to represent their interests.  We are getting close to having the choice between two candidates and what they want to do.  It’s a big change and one that we will regret as a city.  I don’t really care if my councillor is right, left, or centre.  I want one that listens and is for what is in the best interests for my ward.  We are on the brink of losing that if the slate idea keeps building.
  • Of course the incumbents looking after their own electoral interests in excluding old lawn signs (the biggest expense in most civic campaigns) from election spending while making their challengers expense their signs is a joke.  I am glad there is a movement to change this (and credit needs to be given to Charlie Clark and Mairin Loewen for leading this charge previously and in the present).
  • Encourage Hill and others to tweet as they see fit.  It opens up City Hall and City Council meetings.  It encourages citizen participation.  I hear more about Calgary from @nenshi’s Twitter feed than from many other sources.  Who cared about Newark, New Jersey until Mayor Cory Booker started to tweet at @corybooker (and saved some people from burning buildings).  City Council does some a horrible job in communicating as a group, they need any help they can get.  As for the Mayor’s suggestion of a big screen with Tweets go, I am both in favour of it won’t stop trying to hack into it until I take it over one meeting.  Seriously if he was going to do it, stream the #yxecc tag with users that have to sign up each meeting.  I would love to see Mike San Miguel’s, Darren Hill’s, my own, Jeff Jackson, and other tweets as we went along.  I can’t imagine how big a distraction it would be to council but I think we have established that they don’t always pay attention.

So just like politicians everywhere, instead of focusing on the real issue, they are focusing on smartphones and Twitter.  I think it comes from not being able to see the forest through the trees.

I no longer care what you think.

Derek Powazek wrote this last year

Life on the net can be hard. It’s human nature to want to be liked, and to feel bad when someone says something negative to you. And if it’s one thing we all know about the internet, it’s that at any moment, someone, somewhere, is saying something negative.

An easy solution would be to withdraw, to not participate at all. But the world is getting more digital, not less. Eventually we won’t have a choice: if we want any kind of social life, we’ll have to participate in the social web.

Another solution would be to develop a thicker skin. And while I’ve certainly done that over the years, I never want to become so callous that I just don’t care about anything. I want to be able to be myself in the world.

So the solution I’ve come to is this: I care a lot about a very small group of people. I maintain a hierarchy of who I need to be okay with. It starts with my wife Heather, my parents and my sister, and includes my clients and a very short list of friends. You know who’s not on that list? Anonymous internet commenters. For them and everyone else not on the list, I just try to remember a saying I heard once: “Your opinion of me is none of my business.”

If you’re reading this, chances are, you’re not on that list, and I’m sorry if that hurts your feelings. But the truth is, I’m probably not on your list, either. It’s okay if our hearts are not yet big enough to include everyone they deserve.

He manages it this way

If you use Twitter, you pay attention to your mentions – the tweets that include @yourusername – because that’s how you have conversations. And therein lies the problem, because anyone can tweet at you that way. Some of those people are batshit crazy like the Haight Street Guy, while others are just merely rude like the Conference Talker Guy.

The difference is, on Haight Street, you have to walk briskly away and hope you’re not followed. And at the conference, you have to de-escalate the conversation politely, in front of a crowd. But on Twitter, there is a magic button, and in one click, poof, the crazy is gone.

It’s a wonderful thing. A thing so lovely I often find myself wishing it existed in real life.So why is blocking such a taboo?

I think the Block function on sites like Twitter and Flickr is unfortunately named. There’s something about the word – Block! – that comes across as a personal insult. And that’s too bad, because it’s basically the only tool we have to effectively manage our social experience in those communities.

I propose that blocking people on sites like Twitter or Flickr should not be interpreted as an insult. I propose that it’s simply taking yourself out of someone else’s attention stream.

If I block you on Twitter, my tweets no longer show up in your timeline. If I block you on Flickr, my photos no longer show up on your contacts page. In these settings, this is the only way for me to remove myself from your attention.

I don’t know what Derek defines as his breaking point.  Over the years I have left a couple of comments on both his and Heather’s Flickr and Twitter streams that have been sometimes ignored and sometimes replied to but I haven’t been blocked.  I tend to do the same thing although I fall more on the ignore side of the things which doesn’t mean I don’t care but it often means I have nothing to say back.  It’s how Twitter works.  I hadn’t thought of it that much until someone that I know unknowingly posted something fairly offensive on my Twitter stream and I was going to reply when I realized that I didn’t care what this person thought of my views so I hit “block”.  I used to do it quite a bit on my blog but a combination of blocking those that just want to argue and not posting very much eliminated the need.

I get a lot of criticism and feedback at work.  I work with the hard to house and many have significant anger issues along with a variety of social disorders.  When they don’t get their way, they generally comment on my weight, my intelligence, my faith, being bald, and being ugly.  It happens day in and day out but at the end of the day I can go home and relax.  To log in and get it day in and day out when all I want to do is a little reading and writing is absurd.  By blocking you, I remove my offensive views from your attention and we are both happier.  My piece of the internet is free from inane comments, your net is free of my views that bother you so much.  There is such a thing as win/win and it’s found by clicking block.

Powazek talks of the need to stay reconciled with some people but I find that those people don’t take stupid potshots online.   The other thing is that there is a difference between being close to someone and having to interact with them online.  Facebook and myself don’t get along that well.  It doesn’t mean that I don’t like people who choose to interact there, it just means that I choose not to interact with them there.  Same with online.  On Twitter I choose who I follow but I can also choose who I want to follow me and I am realizing more and more, I don’t want all people interacting with me there.   I realize that some people that are normal in person are jerks online.  If you don’t like it, I think I just said, I don’t really care.

Life in the cloud

As SaskTel winds down CDMA coverage in Saskatchewan, I need to upgrade Mark’s cell phone (a LG Rumor 2) that he loves.  He is on a cheap pre-paid plan with Virgin that I don’t want to upgrade or add data so I will keep with a feature phone, probably a LG Rumor Plus or a Samsung Gravity 3.  It’s talk, text, and email which is really all Mark needs right now.

I have been thinking about what I need ever since RIM’s network when down last summer.  This is how I am thinking.  I had a Blackberry Curve 8530 and like a lot of smartphone users, I have everything flowing through that phone.

  • Two email accounts
  • Blackberry Messenger
  • Text
  • Twitter
  • Flickr (which never worked on the phone)
  • Dropbox so I could send and receive files
  • The Score Mobile App (I have a problem okay)
  • MySask411 which replaced my phone book

I got a fair amount of work done and even wrote a couple of columns with it.  It worked really well for me until that outage.  When Blackberry went down, so did my phone.  I couldn’t get calls, I couldn’t even connect to a Wifi network.  My phone was essentially a brick that I carried around and hoped would return.  While it wasn’t the reason I switched a Samsung Galaxy Ace over Christmas (the cost of the new Curve’s were high on Koodo and didn’t seem to offer a lot more capability as well as my general lack of faith in the Blackberry platform) I essentially swapped out RIM for being totally dependent on Google and this week I had an uncomfortable realization about how totally dependent I am on Google.

I was one of the first bunch of Gmail users way back in 2004, back in the days where invites were limited to five per person and where actually being sold for money.  I got one, used my five invites on Wendy and some friends.  Gmail was so new and fresh it had that new email smell to it.  It served me well until this year when I got a notice that my email had been accessed by someone using an IP address from  Serbia.  It was really unsettling because as I had a decent password and changed it periodically.  Having not travelled to Serbia recently (or ever) the idea that I had been hacked was a horrible one.

As for my ID, you have your drivers license, your passport, your Saskatchewan Health Card, your Social Insurance Number but my email is just as big of a part of my ID as anything.  I have used it to sign up for Flickr, YouTube, Twitter, PayPal, even my bank and credit card uses it to communicate with me.  While I am careful, having everything exposed was not that pleasant and it resulted in new credit cards being issues, new passwords, and really all new everything.

Shortly after that I had a huge problem with email.  Emails were missing and there was about a 1500 email hole from about a year before that I discovered.  I wasn’t the only one that has had this happen to me.  The Gmail help forums are full of users that have lost thousands of emails and no one really knows why.

Since then there is someone that I will email periodically at The StarPhoenix that occasionally doesn’t acknowledge the email.  I am the same way so I never thought of it until Friday when I got a call from my editor to see why I never filed my column except I did on Wednesday.  I resent the column and it appeared.  It’s the second time it happened but I have long had these sneaking suspicions that it was a problem with the @thestarphoenix.com domain.  I checked the Gmail help forum and it tells me that I need to check with the domain name that wasn’t getting my email as they are of course faultless.  Of course the email was never received.

This isn’t the first time this happened.  A friend used to work at USA Today.  An email I sent him took a full year one time to show up.  I was working somewhere else and using their email (which was served up on Dreamhost) was the only server they ever had a problem with and then only sometimes.  It has happened to me before from SaskTel where an email just hung out for month before being delivered.  It happens but how do you know it happens.  I never got a bounce message in any of those situations so I assumed (incorrectly) that it had gone through.  Maybe we need to downgrade to Eudora 3 and start sending read receipts again.

So on Friday, my email was down, my cell phone was acting erratic (I think the problem was Koodo) and I realize that when things go down, they really go down.   What can you do about it?

Gmail

Leaving Gmail is really hard because I think we underestimate how much spam and email that we get and I really don’t want that to make it to my phone.  I know SaskTel has web access but so many friends of mine have had their email account become totally full after a couple of days that it is pointless if you are a heavy email user.   I can set up a 500mb account for myself on Dreamhost but I get thousands of spam a day and Gmail handles it better than anyone else.  I am in the process of putting coop AT jordoncooper.com to rest which will cut back on some of the spam but it’s a big problem when you are have old email accounts.  There are a lot of things that still use it, including some that I am sure I don’t remember but will need someday.

As Wired Magazine published yesterday, Gmail has a pretty big security hole in it.

But since Gmail added OAuth support in March 2010, an increasing number of startups are asking for a perpetual, silent window into your inbox.

I’m concerned OAuth, while hugely convenient for both developers and users, may be paving the way for an inevitable privacy meltdown.

For most of the last decade, alpha geeks railed against “the password anti-pattern,” the common practice for web apps to prompt for your password to a third-party, usually to scrape your e-mail address book to find friends on a social network. It was insecure and dangerous, effectively training users how to be phished.

The solution was OAuth, an open standard that lets you grant permission for one service to connect to another without ever exposing your username or password. Instead of passwords getting passed around, services are issued a token they can use to connect on your behalf.

If you’ve ever granted permission for a service to use your Twitter, Facebook, or Google account, you’ve used OAuth.

This was a radical improvement. It’s easier for users, taking a couple of clicks to authorize accounts, and passwords are never sent insecurely or stored by services who shouldn’t have them. And developers never have to worry about storing or transmitting private passwords.

But this convenience creates a new risk. It’s training people not to care.

It’s so simple and pervasive that even savvy users have no issue letting dozens of new services access their various accounts.

I’m as guilty as anyone, with 49 apps connected to my Google account, 80 to Twitter, and over 120 connected to Facebook. Others are more extreme. Samuel Cole, a developer at Kickstarter, authorized 148 apps to use his Twitter account. NYC entrepreneur Anil Dash counted 88 apps using his Google account, with nine granted access to Gmail.

This is where it gets nerve wracking.

You may trust Google to keep your email safe, but do you trust a three-month-old Y Combinator-funded startup created by three college kids? Or a side project from an engineer working in his 20 percent time? How about a disgruntled or curious employee of one of these third-party services?

Any of these services becomes the weakest link to access the e-mail for thousands of users. If one’s hacked or the list of tokens leaked, everyone who ever used that service risks exposing his complete Gmail archive.

The scariest thing? If the third-party service doesn’t discover the hack or chooses not to invalidate its tokens, you may never know you’re exposed.

The reliability isn’t just a Gmail issue but most of us switched to Gmail because it was run by Google and we never thought that we would have these issues. 

The other issue with Google is that even though they post an Apps Dashboard to let you know how things are going, this is a multi-billion dollar company with no way to contact them unless you are a large customer.  I have had Gmail down and nothing shows up on the Dashboard so it has to be a big outage to report it.  That’s fine if you are affected with others but if you are not part of a giant collective of frustrated Gmail users losing control on Twitter, what recourse do you have.  Google tells you to that they look at help forums but there are thousands of unresolved issues, some that go on for a long time.  This isn’t unique to Google, a friend had a nightmare in getting locked out of his Twitter account because of a Twitter database error.  It look a couple of months to resolve and that was even after it’s CEO got involved.  At least you can contact Dick Costello, who do you contact anymore at Google?

Google Contacts

I download and backup periodically my contacts for a couple of reasons, I need to keep them sync’d across my two accounts (one for work, the other one is personal).  They are also sync’d on my iPod Touch, iPad, and Android phone.  Of course I just read on Kottke this week that stealing your address book among iPhone developers is quite common.

It’s not really a secret, per se, but there’s a quiet understanding among many iOS app developers that it is acceptable to send a user’s entire address book, without their permission, to remote servers and then store it for future reference. It’s common practice, and many companies likely have your address book stored in their database. Obviously, there are lots of awesome things apps can do with this data to vastly improve user experience. But it is also a breach of trust and an invasion of privacy.

I did a quick survey of 15 developers of popular iOS apps, and 13 of them told me they have a contacts database with millons of records. One company’s database has Mark Zuckerberg’s cell phone number, Larry Ellison’s home phone number and Bill Gates’ cell phone number. This data is not meant to be public, and people have an expectation of privacy with respect to their contacts.

So while I am giving all of my contact information to Google intentionally, I (and so are most of you) am un-intentionally  giving up your contact information to developers (sorry about that) which is one of the reasons why there is so much spam in this world.  Thanks Apple.  So even if Google is protecting our private information, as soon as we sync it with our iPhone or iPad, it is compromised.

This brings up my next issue, which phone vendor can we trust? Apple allows people to download your most private of personal information, Google controls and ties it all together in an Android phone, with Blackberry you just have a crappy phone experience and does anyone expect Windows 7 Phone to be any better.  RIM has better security but isn’t able to deliver on their phones.

I was talking to a businessman who has been tied to his phone since AGT came out with the Aurora (such old technology, Google doesn’t even know about it) and he said to me the other day that he was willing to ditch his smart phone and go back to a flip phone (or a feature phone so he could text his kids).  His company email server was down and he couldn’t do “anything” and was frustrated in the same way we all get frustrated.  He said with a regular cell phone, when it went down, all it did was affect his phone calls.  Now when his smartphone isn’t working, it affects everything.  He was actually in the process of heading to Midtown Mall and purchase a cheap phone so as he put it, at “least I can call someone”.  In some ways as I looked at a Nokia C1 by Fido today I wondered if this may be what I really want, an update to the Nokia 1100 which is still the world’s most popular phone.

Koodo

Koodo’s cellular service is okay here in Saskatoon.  They use Telus’ network and do a not bad job of staying active.  I find that when SaskTel is having problems, so is Telus/Koodo which makes me feel somewhat better but not a lot.  In other words when I get no service at my house, neither does anyone else using SaskTel, Telus, or Virgin.  When Koodo’s network is acting up, I can tell by looking at my phone when something is wrong.  My Foursquare check-in options revolve around Carlton University’s campus, my network says Telus or even SaskTel instead of Koodo, and my calls drop more than they should.  Wireless is defined by it’s Ready, Shoot, Aim background and we shouldn’t be surprised with it’s technical difficulties considering the rate that technology is changing but more and more I keep wondering if a step back may be order and evaluate if I want all of my personal information being in a platform that is so easily exploited. 

Even if you can trust them now, can you trust them in the future.  Google’s recent privacy changes spooked millions and may have launched a competitor in Duck, Duck, Go.  These aren’t new concerns as I remember AKMA struggling with how much he should trust Flickr years ago.

I could come off the cloud but that is a lot easier said than done.  I could use Thunderbird for email and contacts and Lightning as a calendar.  I could use Dreamhost’s IMAP server, keep my email off my phone, and ditch my iPad, or at least not sync up information with it.  It can be done but it is a very different 1998 era web that I don’t think I want to go back to either.

When you think of the information you have in your Gmail account, address book, calendar, and other apps (think of Mint and your bank app on your phone), why aren’t we either demanding more security or at least taking steps to protect ourselves.  I know RIM’s the most secure but their phones are terrible right now.  I wonder if the next thing in wireless will not just be the cool apps but the cool apps that protect your data because right now my data isn’t feeling all that safe.

The story of Mark Horvath

I met Mark during his visit to Saskatoon last summer but have been a fan of his work online for sometime.  Here is his story and a trailer for a movie about his work.

Showing how you can change the world via Twitter and YouTube.  You can find more about what Mark is doing at Invisible People.tv

Working hard to raise the level of discourse

My biggest contribution so far to the Saskatchewan election

Working hard to raise the level of discourse

Early anniversary gift

Wendy's Samsung Galaxy 550I had wanted to upgrade Wendy’s Samsung Link for a while now as Virgin Mobile has had some entry level Android smartphones out for a while.  Every time I went out and looked, they were sold out.  I finally tracked one down today at Best Buy and decided to pick up a Samsung Galaxy 550.  It’s not cutting edge but it runs Foursquare, Twitter, Angry Birds, Flickr, and a bunch of other apps pretty well while being a lot cheaper than an iPhone.  While I don’t think it will make me want to give up my Blackberry, it’s a pretty decent little phone.  The bad part is now our competition on Foursquare is heating up.

While I am talking about Virgin Mobile, Visions Electronics is giving away free Virgin phones with no contracts.  You can cancel a month into it if you want.  They have the LG Rumor 2, the Samsung Gravity 3, and some others.

What has Warren Kinsella done lately?

The other day in the hospital, Mark complained to me about his Twitter user name.  He doesn’t like @coopermark and said it looked stupid.  I replied to him that others have that form of username.  When pressed who I was referring to, I said Warren Kinsella’s username on Twitter is @kinsellawarren.  Mark asked who Kinsella was and I said, he helps Liberal’s win elections.  Mark replied with, “So he hasn’t done much lately.”

A Year In Review

After reading Sean Shaw’s review of 2010 for his blog, I started to look at the stats and demographics of jordoncooper.com.  This is what I discovered.

The bulk of my visitors are from the United States and then Canada followed the by U.K.  The site used to be blocked in China but I see the Great Firewall of China has invited me back in for 2010.

Of course there are countries that aren’t so found of this site.  In 2010 it received no visitors from the following countries; Western Sahara, Guinea, Burkina Faso, Niger, Chad, Central African Republic, Gabon, Mozambique, Somalia, Swaziland, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.  Then again Sean’s blog could be sucking up all of the traffic from these countries.

My worldwide marketing efforts paid off and I received one visitor each from Cuba, Palau, New Caledonia, Greenland, Mali, Mauritania, Sierra Leone, Senegal, Maldives, Laos, Turks and Caicos Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Saint Helena, Congo [DRC], Montserrat, and the Solomon Islands.

My march towards worldwide media domination is working as traffic has doubled in other parts of the world and I have received two visits from each of the following countries.  Benin, Namibia, Grenada, Gibraltar, Cameroon, Kyrgyzstan, Haiti, Madagascar, Myanmar [Burma], Libya, Paraguay, Albania, Botswana, Yemen, Zambia, Moldova, and Réunion.

The top ten keywords of 2010

  1. jordon cooper
  2. jordan cooper (they could be looking for this guy)
  3. narcissistic personality disorder
  4. impact of facebook
  5. facebook impact on society
  6. ford festiva
  7. impact of facebook on society
  8. facebook impact
  9. salvation army christmas hampers
  10. social impact of facebook

As far as technology goes, most of you still use a horrible web browser.  You may want to upgrade to Firefox, Chrome, or Safari.

Jordon Cooper Browser UsedThe most popular phone to browse the site is the iPhone/iPod touch, followed by the Blackberry, Android, and even some T-Mobile Sidekicks.  In 2010 there was also one visitor running OS/2.

Some of the more interesting networks visiting the site more than ten times in 2010 were the RCMP, the Whitehouse (I have had readers now from three different administrations), CTV, Kentucky Department of Corrections, Department of Veterans Affairs, Apple Computer, Briarcrest College (which is interesting in that I used to be banned by them), Defense Research Establishment(apparently there is a military industrial complex), University of Tehran, U.S. Navy, U.S. Department of Justice (was researching a case I had posted about – someone called me to talk about it), USA Today (I think it is a sports blogger), The New York Times (over 1000 page views), Time Inc, Toronto Star, U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Energy (nuclear secrets, second door on your left), U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, the Privy Council Office (page views show a loyal reader in the office), Oral Roberts University (?!), Halliburton, Foreign Affairs Magazine, Council on Foreign Relations, Department of Homeland Security, Department of National Defense (looks like a P.R. thing… looking at my posts on the F-35), Canadian Football League, Canadian House of Commons, Canadian Senate, Canadian Space Agency, Canadian Forces Command and Staff College, and CBS.

As far as Twitter goes, I am being followed by 1,132 people and am blocked by one Saskatoon city councilor.

Winds of protest blowing in Jordan?

It seems to be economic in nature

When rallies erupted in January, they were at first largely tribal affairs in the impoverished Bedouin villages where King Abdullah recruits his forces. But as they spread to Amman, the capital, and to other towns, other disgruntled Jordanians, including Islamists, teachers and leftists, have jumped on the bandwagon.

Not sure if King Abdullah’s plan for dealing with the crisis works

In response, the king at first increased the meagre government pensions and salaries by 20 dinars ($28) a month; few of the beneficiaries sounded grateful. Then, on January 31st, he sacked his government, a time-honoured Jordanian device for fobbing off protest. The new prime minister, Marouf Bakhit, comes from the same Bedouin and military stock as most of the protesters. In a previous stint as prime minister, he placated his Bedouin troops by raising their salaries. Muhammad Sneid, who organised the first rural protest in the town of Dhiban, cheered the appointment of one of his own.

Maybe he could take some advice from his step-mother and start using Twitter.

Facebook, Google look to buy Twitter for $10 billion

They are having low level talks… meanwhile this site can be had for the bargain price of $8 billion.

How Twitter/YouTube has changed Foggy Bottom

Good story in the Washington Post

The State Department is tightening its embrace of Twitter and other social media as crises grip the Middle East and Haiti, with officials finding new voice, cheek and influence in the era of digital diplomacy.

Even as it struggles to contain damage caused by WikiLeaks’ release of classified internal documents, the department is reaching out across the Internet. It’s bypassing traditional news outlets to connect directly and in real time with overseas audiences in the throes of unrest and upheaval.

American diplomacy isn’t a newcomer to Facebook, YouTube, Flickr or Twitter, but it has stepped up online efforts as those networks play a growing role in events around the world.

In recent days, department spokesman P.J. Crowley has tweeted to knock down rumors, amplify U.S. policy positions, appeal for calm and urge reforms in Haiti, Tunisia and Lebanon.

Well before he addressed the State Department press corps on the return to Haiti of former dictator Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier and the possible return of ousted President Jean-Betrand Aristide, Crowley took to Twitter to pronounce the U.S. position

"We are surprised by the timing of Duvalier’s visit to Haiti," he wrote last Monday, a federal holiday in the U.S. "It adds unpredictability at an uncertain time in Haiti’s election process."

Late Thursday night, Crowley commented on Aristide. "We do not doubt President Aristide’s desire to help the people of Haiti. But today Haiti needs to focus on its future, not its past."

He also outed the official State Department position on the Toronto Maple Leafs and takes a pot shot at the Chicago Bears.  Just like any I’d expect any Assistant Secretary of State to do.   Awesome.

About.Me

Jordon Cooper on About Me

I usually don’t get that excited about sites like this but about.me does a great job of creating personal website/contact pages that professionally pulls together weblogs, Twitter, LinkedIn, Flickr, Foursquare, YouTube, and other web services into one page with a user defined URL which makes it perfect for your Twitter bio, a business card, or an email signature.  It’s free (although the pro option has more design options).  For me, it combines both ease of use and the ability to easily personalize and express yourself online.

You can see mine, but check out Dick Costello, Chris Cunningham, Veronica BelmontLeo Laporte, Wendy Cooper, Tony Conrad, Mark Cooper, Catherine Valdes, Om Malik, or Jamal Mashburn.  I don’t think it is a game changer or anything like that but if you don’t have a personal website and don’t want to go through the fuss of setting one up or keeping a blog maintained, this is a great option.

Blackberry Curve Build Out

Blackberry Curve 8530 from Koodo MobileOn the 27th I went to Best Buy to take a look at DSLR’s on sale.  I didn’t see any DSLRs but while I was there, I saw that Koodo had dropped their price on Blackberry Curves to $150 and no contract.  I had thought about getting a LG Rumor 2 this year but after looking into it, we decided to get the Curve.  I had been quite happy with Virgin but I have had technical problems with my account for two years and it was getting worse.  While Virgin’s tech support and customer service staff have been really helpful, they still could not fix the problem so I finally decided to make the move.

Blackberry by RIMI took the phone home and started to set it up.  Here is how I put it together.

The first thing I did was get my Curve set up to our wifi connection in the house.  That wasn’t working that well.  Then I realized my router was about a billion years old (it was a 801b router) and it needed an upgrade.  Since my new router was on my desk, it was pretty easy to upgrade.  The Curve, my iPod Touch, and our notebook suddenly worked a lot faster.  I upgraded my old router’s firmware and will give it Computers for Kids and if they don’t want it, it can go to SARCAN.

Here is are the apps that made their way onto it over the last couple of days.

Utilities

Social Networks

  • foursquare app for the BlackberryFoursquare | It doesn’t yet use wifi but it allows you to check in and out all over the place.  It’s one of those apps that doesn’t make sense until you use it and then you love it.
  • Twitter | Umm, it’s one of the main reasons why I upgraded to a Blackberry.
  • Facebook (one the off chance for some reason I need to actually log in sometime… maybe in 2012)
  • Flickr | It’s an uploader that uploads my camera phone shots to Flickr.  It rather annoyingly resizes them but I’ll deal with that later.

News and Sports

Am I missing anything?  Let me know in the comments.

How Facebook Divided the Web

Adam Rifkin at TechCrunch has a great post on how Facebook has divided the internet.

Reliability issues aside, there’s a deeper principle at stake here. Facebook has divided the Web into two: the Web with Facebook (your friends), and the Web without Facebook (people cooler than your friends). Our friends are who we are interested in, but they are not what we are interested in.

All the time we spend looking at repetitive posts and photos from people we already know, could be spent instead on the Web meeting new people who are interested in the same things we are. In other words, making cooler friends. Ambient Findability, as I like to call it, means that what (and who!) we find changes who (and what!) we become. Enabling that is what has always made the Web great.

So, in the spirit of One Web and Ambient Findability, I’m asking Facebook on behalf of all Web citizens to give us the benefits of being able to just look at things online without being tracked by you. Give us the option to treat Facebook like every other part of the Web, whenever we want, and I assure you it will benefit us all.

Give us an easy one-click way to truly and totally disconnect from Facebook Connect whenever we want. I’ll still spend just as much time on Facebook, I promise! But now I won’t have to see my friends’ faces every time I look up a restaurant review on Yelp, read the news on the New York Times, or wait for external modules to load on TechCrunch. It’s just an option, and an option confers value… I’m sure the vast majority of users love Facebook Connect and will continue to use it. But having the option to return the rest of One Web to its pre-Facebook status—useful but not fundamentally social—would be the best gift that Zuck could give back to the Web.