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Why veterans are upset with Julian Fantino

Stephen Maher looks at why veterans are upset with Julian Fantino

Most of the frontline workers at the offices in Saskatoon, Sydney, Brandon, Thunder Bay, Windsor, Sydney, Charlottetown and Corner Brook are being eliminated — about 100 people across the country, according to numbers put together by the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

The union says the government is getting rid of 784 jobs throughout the department in the next two years. Departmental reports show that Veterans Affairs, which had 3,758 employees in 2006-2007, when the Tories took office, will employ just 2,755 by 2015-16.

If there are fewer people working at Veterans Affairs, and fewer offices where veterans can sit down with trained support workers, it’s likely that more of them will fail to fill out the right forms and won’t get the support they deserve.

This has already been identified as a problem.

A 2012 report from Auditor General Michael Ferguson found that National Defence and Veterans Affairs “have difficulties in communicating and meeting service delivery standards and requirements, particularly as they relate to assessments and case management services. The result may be that Forces members and veterans do not receive benefits and services to which they are entitled, or do not receive them in a timely manner.”

Second World War and Korea veterans are getting on in years, and may need help in identifying what services may be helpful to them. Younger veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder can find it difficult to reach out for help. It’s hard to see how shutting offices will make their lives better.

All of which is to say that veterans have darned good reasons to be concerned.

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