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How to Create a Passionate Work Culture

From Fast Company

How to Create a Passionate Work Culture1. Hire the right people

Hire for passion and commitment first, experience second, and credentials third. There is no shortage of impressive CVs out there, but you should try to find people who are interested in the same things you are. You don’t want to be simply a stepping stone on an employee’s journey toward his or her own (very different) passion. Asking the right questions is key: What do you love about your chosen career? What inspires you? What courses in school did you dread? You want to get a sense of what the potential employee believes.

2. Communicate

Once you have the right people, you need to sit down regularly with them and discuss what is going well and what isn’t. It’s critical to take note of your victories, but it’s just as important to analyze your losses. A fertile culture is one that recognizes when things don’t work and adjusts to rectify the problem. As well, people need to feel safe and trusted, to understand that they can speak freely without fear of repercussion.

The art of communication tends to put the stress on talking, but listening is equally important. Great cultures grow around people who listen, not just to each other or to their clients and stakeholders. It’s also important to listen to what’s happening outside your walls. What is the market saying? What is the zeitgeist? What developments, trends, and calamities are going on?

3. Tend to the weeds

A culture of passion capital can be compromised by the wrong people. One of the most destructive corporate weeds is the whiner. Whiners aren’t necessarily public with their complaints. They don’t stand up in meetings and articulate everything they think is wrong with the company. Instead, they move through the organization, speaking privately, sowing doubt, strangling passion. Sometimes this is simply the nature of the beast: they whined at their last job and will whine at the next. Sometimes these people simply aren’t a good fit. Your passion isn’t theirs. Constructive criticism is healthy, but relentless complaining is toxic. Identify these people and replace them.

2 Comments

  1. trevor says:

    I’d probably disagree with this. I’d put experience above passion when making hiring decisions – I’d rather have competence than ‘passion’ in an employee.

    Not least, passion is a pretty hard thing to define or quantify, even if it is a popular buzzword in corporations and churches these days. I’ve done plenty of jobs where I’ve turned up and done what I’m getting paid to do, without anyone asking me whether I was ‘passionate’ about, say, financial risk calculation, or event management, or auto manufacturing.

  2. Will says:

    The author should have really titled this article “How to find people willing to work a 60-hour week for almost no money for your new high-tech start-up.”

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