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The weekend

I am back from a week in Winnipeg and have just enough time to do some laundry, hug the kids, toss the ball to the dog before I have to head back to Winnipeg for some more meetings.  Of course it wouldn’t be so bad if the drive wasn’t so unbelievably boring.  The scenery doesn’t change from the time you leave Lumsden until you get to Winnipeg.  It’s just flat.  No rolling hills, no nothing.  Just windswept prairie.  There wasn’t even radio for part of the trip.

I did bring a couple of cameras along with me and manage to take some photos of what I found interesting in Winnipeg.  First of all, since it was mind numbingly cold there, I could not help but notice that they have some great covered and heated bus shelters

Bus shelters in Winnipeg

Bus shelters in Winnipeg

Each bus stop has two entrances/exits which keep the garbage from blowing in, a common characteristic of the city of Saskatoon bus shelters.  The doors also keep the heat in which are located under the bench seating.  The other feature that I liked is that it looks like there was some architectural creativity put into their design, not all of them are alike and quite a few had some great design characteristics (I would have taken more photos but I was driving).

As you can see, they also include real time updates on when the next bus is going to be there, which is quite helpful when out exploring the city and on an unfamiliar line or when you are trying to figure out if you have time to run to Tim Horton’s before you next bus comes along.

Bus shelters in Winnipeg

So there is at least one thing that Winnipeg does better than Saskatoon.  I may be hard pressed to find another one.

One Comment

  1. [...] to make the city more liveable in winter and heat the shelter during the winter.  As I wrote before, I was amazed that even in –40 weather in WInnipeg, I was able to take off my toque, undo my [...]

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