Nutana Collegiate Institute

Nutana Collegiate Institute

I posted this photo at Bridge City today.  It’s of Nutana Collegiate and has been to research the project.  The mystery is who is the actual architect of Nutana Collegiate.  Sources list multiple architects and after wading through a lot of conflicting archives, here is what I think I know.

The original 1910 building was designed by Storey and Van Egmond.  David Webster was the architect of the 1919-1920 addition.  Edwards, Edwards & McEwan Architects did the 2012 refurbishment and renovations.

As far as some of the other architects that I have read that have been attributed as the architect of the school, I have no idea.  After reading up on the history of quite a few buildings in Saskatoon, it’s not that uncommon that different architects (in particular David Webster) are listed as the designer.  Blame sloppy record keeping or a later owner wanting his or her building to be associated with a more well known architect.  Whatever the case, it makes the histories of some of Saskatoon’s old buildings more interesting.

Let me know in the comments if you have other information, I’d love to hear what you think or know.

Conservatives are Attacking Palin. What changed?

She personalized the attacks on her and her family

In fairness, Palin was once a reform-minded governor who enjoyed an 88 percent approval rating. But something happened on the way to Des Moines. I suspect the most vicious attacks (especially the “Trig Truther” stuff) radicalized her and embittered her, but I also suspect she also took the easy way out. Instead of going back to Alaska after the 2008 defeat, boning up on the issues, continuing her work as governor, and forging a national political comeback, she cashed in with reality-TV shows and paid speaking gigs.

This isn’t an original or new observation, In fact, back in July 2009, I wrote: “The tragedy of Sarah Palin’s recent press conference announcing her resignation as governor of Alaska flows from the sense that so much potential has been wasted.”

The trouble with taking the easy way out is that it doesn’t last forever. The people who truly last in this business don’t rely on shortcuts or good looks or gimmicks; they survive on work ethic, wit, and intellect. (That’s why, no matter how grandiose he gets, Newt Gingrich will always have a gig. Newt will always be interesting, because he will always have something to say—something to contribute.)

I had dinner a couple of months ago with a politician of a different political philosophy than I.  This was a big part of our talk.  Governments and politicians that can engage with their critics are far more successful in the long term (think Peter Lougheed or a Bill Davis) than those that treat all criticism as a personal attack that must be defeated.

Of course more troubling are the personal attacks, even if they have a hint of accuracy.  What do you do about them?   Some can shrug them off while others are changed by them.  Palin was changed by them.  I was never a fan but I agree that instead of fixing her flaws, she has doubled down on them, something that too many politicians do.

Westgate Books

I’ve been having some fun at Westgate Books lately.  A couple of weeks ago I wandered into the store looking for Saskatoon: A History in Photographs by Jeff O’Brien, Ruth Miller and William P. Delainey.  They didn’t have it but the staff that was helping me went to look in the warehouse.  Instead of the book I was looking for, he came up with two books, Saskatoon, the First Half Century by Don Kerr and a Saskatoon, Hub City of the West: an Illustrated History by Gail McConnell. 

I looked at them and took them both.  I also put my name down on a list if Saskatoon: A History in Photographs came in.  A couple of days later I got a phone call that told me that my book was in and come to pick it up.  Last Friday I went back to get it and it was the wrong book.  It was Saskatoon: A Century in Pictures by  William Duerkop, John Sarjeant and William Delainey  In hindsight I kind of wondered if there was a bit of miscommunication when I ordered Saskatoon: A Century in Pictures but I looked at this book and I realized I wanted to read it as well.  I had a blast all week looking at it.  So has Mark.

Since I am talking about books, it looks like Gail McConnell was doing Kickstarter long before Kickstarter was a thing.  The last 20 or so pages of her book is dedicated to patrons who helped pay to publish her book.  Local Saskatoon businesses sponsored the project and she does a one page profile on each company.  Who knew a history book could be so cutting edge.

While I was getting that book, another staff at Westgate Books went looking for the book in case they missed it and found me another book on the history of electric transit in Saskatoon.  I didn’t have the money on me to get it so they put that away for me.  I’ll wander by this week and get it.  Now I am curious as to what other books I will find in my brief stop at the store.

I know being in the used book business is a hard business to be in but I haven’t had as much fun shopping as I have had in Westgate Books in a very long time.  I hope that still counts for something.

True North?

So Justin Trudeau and the Liberals have a new ad out.  Canadian politicians since the days of John G. Diefenbaker have been loving the north.  John Turner, Jean Chretien, Stephen Harper all love the north.   It’s expected that Justin Trudeau loves the north as well… and wants to make it better!  That’s it.  

As a voter, I want to hear how.  What is the big strategy.  There is some political room for him to maneveur as Harper has really accomplished nothing as part of his northern agenda.  The Department of National Defence can’t even procure rifles for the Rangers (who arguably don’t need replacements for their bolt action rifles that work really well in the winter).  Plans for a deepwater port?  Umm that has gone nowhere.  

Instead of just matching Harper’s unfulfilled and broken promises with real ideas, Trudeau just floated out some cliches and feel good statements.  In other words, not much has changed.

Why Finnish babies sleep in cardboard boxes

From the BBC

It’s a tradition that dates back to the 1930s and it’s designed to give all children in Finland, no matter what background they’re from, an equal start in life.

The maternity package – a gift from the government – is available to all expectant mothers.

It contains bodysuits, a sleeping bag, outdoor gear, bathing products for the baby, as well as nappies, bedding and a small mattress.

With the mattress in the bottom, the box becomes a baby’s first bed. Many children, from all social backgrounds, have their first naps within the safety of the box’s four cardboard walls.

Why?  As one Finlander says

My partner Milla and I were living in London when we had our first child, Jasper, so we weren’t eligible for a free box. But Milla’s parents didn’t want us to miss out, so they bought one and put it in the post.

We couldn’t wait to get the lid off. There were all the clothes you would expect, with the addition of a snowsuit for Finland’s icy winters. And then the box itself. I had never considered putting my baby to sleep in a cardboard box, but if it’s good enough for the majority of Finns, then why not? Jasper slept in it – as you might expect – like a baby.

We now live in Helsinki and have just had our second child, Annika. She did get a free box from the Finnish state. This felt to me like evidence that someone cared, someone wanted our baby to have a good start in life. And now when I visit friends with young children it’s nice to see we share some common things. It strengthens that feeling that we are all in this together.

Okay, I love this idea.